While the majority of funds raised by our Foundation are committed to enhancing our provincial maternal and children’s hospital, a portion is available for grants. Each year, up to $1,000,000 is allocated for grants to support pediatric and maternal needs.

Past Disbursements

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation disbursed $15,483,837 in urgent provincial maternal and pediatric needs and for Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital between August 1, 2020 and July 31, 2021. In addition to the funds raised above, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exceptional researchers and research needs.

JPCHF also proudly announces that the full commitment of $75 million to the Saskatchewan Health Authority for JPCH build is now complete.

EQUIPMENT/TECHNOLOGY

Ambulatory and Portable EEG Equipment

Funds raised through the 2021 Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Radiothon raised almost $900,000 to support Ambulatory and Portable EEG equipment for Saskatchewan’s Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital.  

Mobile Dental and Mental Health Bus

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation in partnership with Synergy 8 Community Builders, Saskatoon Tribal Council, the Federal and Provincial Governments helped outfit a mobile bus which travels to the seven First Nations communities of the Saskatoon Tribal Council five days a week offering children and teens access to dental care, a listening ear and solid support and resources to help guide them along their path to enhanced physical and mental health.

Baby Leo Isolettes, NICU

With generous donor support, Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation was able to provide funding for eight (8) Baby Leo Isolettes, helping provide our littlest of patients the enhanced care when they require it most.

Endoscopic Laryngeal Equipment, Pediatric Surgery

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation was pleased to provide funding for Endoscopic Laryngeal Equipment at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital. Through this purchase, pediatric specialists have been able to perform procedures on a large backlog of patients, with scopes that are appropriate to each patients’ size.

Pulse Dye Laser, Pediatric Surgery

Having critically needed medical equipment at Saskatchewan’s Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital helps keep children closer to home. Medical teams are able to use the Pulse Dye Laser funded by JPCHF to treat patients with port-wine stains, hemangioma and cutaneous lesions in a life-changing, safe, effective manner.

Supported Saskatchewan’s Only Pediatric Intensive Care Unit by funding two Pediatric Simulation Training Dolls, PICU

Hands-on simulation training equipment benefits children admitted to the Emergency Room and their medical team in Saskatchewan’s only PICU. This training equipment provides medical teams the ability to practice high-risk procedures in a low-risk environment. When seconds count, your support helps medical teams make critical decisions quickly and effectively to help save children’s lives.

Specialized Strollers, Pediatric Inpatients

Children admitted to the Pediatric Inpatients Unit at Saskatchewan’s Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital require the use of specialized equipment to ensure their stay is comfortable and safe. Specialized strollers funded by JPCHF help medical teams and caregivers safely transport children to and from therapies around the hospital with ease.

Non-Invasive Ventilation for Sleep Lab

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation is helping children with respirology care for obstructive sleep apnea get treatments sooner. JPCHF was pleased to provide funding for Non-Invasive Ventilation in Saskatchewan’s only dedicated pediatric Sleep Lab at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital.

Masio Monitoring Systems Upgrade

The Neonatal Intensive Care Transport Team is dedicated to ensuring the smallest and sickest patients get the care they need during transport. Having upgraded tools to monitor these tiny humans allow the team to provide accurate, safe care in some of their most critical moments.

Enhancement of Simulation Equipment, PICU

A 9-month old “SimBaby” joined Saskatchewan’s only Pediatric Intensive Care Unit’s training team. This manikin mimics very common critical care emergencies, allowing the teams to practice and perfect critical airway procedures.

Indigenous Birth Support Worker Resources, Maternal

Thanks to the generosity of donors, Indigenous birth support workers can help support important cultural experiences for Indigenous moms-to-be at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital. Indigenous birth support workers now have funding for meaningful resources to use as part of a traditional birth plan which can help provide culturally-appropriate comfort for new moms.

Pediatric Psychology Service – Enhancing Care Where Health and Mental Health Interact

To ease worries and engage young children who require psychology services at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital, donors like you have helped provide “open ended” toys allowing therapists to connect with patients who have highly complex medical conditions. Keeping the child comfortable helps the patient be more open to psychotherapies resulting in overall better mental health.

Virtual Reality for Decreasing Anxiety and Pain During Treatments

The use of Virtual Reality can help patients cope with stressful and often painful procedures by positively engaging and distracting them, allowing their care team to provide quicker treatments with less stress for the child.

Polysomnogram Head Box for SK’s Only Pediatric Sleep Lab

Through donors like you, JPCHF is able to provide specialized equipment to outfit Saskatchewan’s only dedicated pediatric Sleep Lab. Funding for the Polysomnogram Head Box allows medical teams to accurately diagnose sleep related and respiratory disorders such as sleep apnea.

PATIENT CARE

Palliative CareCreating Lasting Legacies
The Creating Lasting Legacies program in Regina offers families a chance to create tangible items that help build and maintain memories of their child. Most of these activities will involve the child, parent or caregiver and siblings in hands on creation of mementos to have when their child passes. Books and other educational materials are supplied to help families better articulate their fears, ask questions and face the difficult task of caring for a gravely ill child.

Empty Arms – Supporting Families Through the Unimaginable
Empty Arms Perinatal Loss Support Services is a registered charity that provides companion support, professional photography and mementos for families who have lost a baby. They support families in hospital as well as before, during and after the birth of their baby. While in-person care and support are centred at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital, they support families from across the province.

Child LifeIncreased Funding for Child Life Therapies
Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation is pleased to provide funding for the Mosaic Child Life Program.  

The Zone is home to certified Child Life specialists who help Saskatchewan children cope with difficult medical challenges through play, education, and self-expression. These specialists teach young patients about their illness and what to expect during treatment. They also provide critical support, before, during, and after procedures.

Patient Entertainment System

JPCHF is pleased to fund patient entertainment systems including radio, tv and games for every patient within JPCH free of charge.

Book Mobile

The Book Mobile program at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital encourages the love of reading by providing a variety of books to children and their families in hospital. Children of all ages are able to enjoy the benefits of the program, which encourages not only silent reading for those who are able to read to themselves, but also opportunities for parents and caregivers to read with their child, promoting bonding experiences.

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program – Early Mobility Equipment Program

Thanks to your generous donor dollars, Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation was able to provide much needed funding to the Alvin Buckwold Child Development Center in support of the Early Mobility Equipment Program.

These funds help purchase specialized mobility equipment which families can use on a trial basis before purchasing for their children.

NicView Cameras

Parents and caregivers are able to have a bedside view of their babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital thanks to world-class technology, NicView Cameras. Families are able to virtually check-in on their babies using any mobile device when they are not able to be in the room while babies heal and grow.

Teddy Bears Anonymous

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation and Teddy Bears Anonymous have partnered to provide teddy bears to each child who is admitted in hospital or travels via ambulance all across Saskatchewan.

Professional Development

CAPWHN Conference
The Canadian Association of Perinatal and Women’s Health Nurses (CAPWHN) represents women’s health, obstetric and newborn nurses from across Canada. CAPWHN aims to promote excellence in nursing practice, leadership, education and research in the areas of perinatal and women’s health care.

Children’s Healthcare Canada Annual Conference
Children’s Healthcare Canada is the only national association that enables local improvements and contributes to system-wide change by building communities across the full continuum of care. This conference is the largest annual meeting of the child and youth healthcare provider community in Canada. It engages a broad stakeholder group of around 400 delegates that include hospital CEOs, CFOs, Senior Administrators, Physicians, Clinical Directors, Multidisciplinary Practitioners, Policy Makers, Researchers, Families, Youth and more.

CPPC & CHC Conference
This annual conference is the largest annual meeting of the child and youth healthcare provider community in Canada. It engages broad stakeholder groups including Hospital CEOs, Chief Financial Officers, Senior Administrators, Physicians, Clinical Directors, Multidisciplinary Practitioners, Policy Makers, Researchers, Families, Youth and many others.

FELLOWSHIPS

Dr. Nikel
Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellowship

This fellowship at the University of Manitoba involves training in high-risk obstetrics, diagnosis and management of obstetrical complications, and obstetrical ultrasound. Following Dr. Nikel’s fellowship, she will be returning to Saskatoon to work with the Maternal Fetal Medicine group.

Dr. Elzahabi and Dr. Sander
Pediatric Anesthesiology Fellowship

Dr. Elzahabi and Dr. Sander both undertook Pediatric Anesthesiology training in 2021 and endeavour to establish full-time practice utilizing this new knowledge within Saskatchewan’s Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital.

RESEARCH

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation provided funding right here in Saskatchewan for innovative research inclusive of:

“Research Chair”
$100,000 restricted allocated for the initiation of a Pediatric Research Chair.

‘High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein in COVID-19 Related MIS in Children ‘ – Dr. Alan Rosenberg

‘Mother’s Bundle: A Peer-Driven Approach to Improving Indigenous Maternal & Birth Outcomes ‘ – Dr. Mamata Pandey

‘The Effect of Wearing a Face Mask for Prevention of COVID-19 Transmission” – Dr. Philip Chilibeck

“Hemoglobin A1c Measurement via Dried Blood Spot in Youth” – Dr. Mark Inman / Dr. Daphne Yau

“PreGain Bone Health Study” – Dr. Munier Nour

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation disbursed $38,336.907 in urgent maternal and pediatric needs and Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital between August 1, 2019 and July 31, 2020. In addition to the funds raised above, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exceptional researchers and research needs.

Department of Pediatrics

FAMILY RESOURCES

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Library Resources
Funds to provide additional resources and support to best support the different groups of patients/families and physicians/clinicians at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital. This grant included a public access computer terminal, print and electronic materials for SHA staff, patients and families members, electronic access for SHA physicians/clinicians to specific drug and point-of-care resources, NeoFax and STATdx, and licenses for SHA staff for PEPID Pediatric Emergency Medicine mobile app.

Equipment/Technology

PROVINCIAL

  • Melfort – Incubator
  • Vein Viewer
  • Phoenix Icon (Retinal Imaging)

SASKATOON & AREA

PICU
Cardiohelp Lung Support System Accessories
This critical piece of equipment will help save the lives of children suffering from respiratory failure who have not responded to standard treatments. It is extremely useful in cases such as severe influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia, which often results in children needing to be ventilated, suffering from severely low oxygen, and spending time in PICU. Influenza A has devastatingly resulted in the deaths of several Saskatchewan children this flu season, and the need for the Cardiohelp machine has never been higher.

Fellowships

Dr. Nikel
Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellowship
This fellowship at the University of Manitoba involves training in high-risk obstetrics, diagnosis and management of obstetrical complications, and obstetrical ultrasound. Following Dr. Nikel’s fellowship, she will be returning to Saskatoon to work with the Maternal Fetal Medicine group.

Dr. Melendez
Pediatric Radiology Fellowship
Dr. Melendez is receiving special training in x-ray, ultrasound, CT, MRI, fluoroscopy and nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric patients in Edmonton, Alberta. Once complete, she will be returning to Saskatoon to be a part of the radiology group at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital/University of Saskatchewan.

Dr. Weiler
Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Fellowship
Dr. Weiler is working with the Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Clinic at SickKids Hospital to gain skills in assessment and medicolegal report writing in cases of suspected child maltreatment. Saskatoon and area has been without a Specialist in Child Maltreatment for more than 10 years. Dr. Weiler has shown great passion and commitment to this area and will be returning to Saskatoon upon completion of his Fellowship to open a child maltreatment clinic/service for Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital.

Patient Care

PROVINCIAL

Palliative Care
Creating Lasting Legacies (Yr 1 of 3)
The Creating Lasting Legacies program in Regina offers families a chance to create tangible items that help build and maintain memories of their child. Most of these activities will involve the child, parent or caregiver and siblings in hands on creation of mementos to have when their child passes. Books and other educational materials are supplied to help families better articulate their fears, ask questions and face the difficult task of caring for a gravely ill child.

Empty Arms – Supporting Families Through the Unimaginable
Empty Arms Perinatal Loss Support Services is a registered charity that provides companion support, professional photography and mementos for families who have lost a baby. They support families in hospital as well as before, during and after the birth of their baby. While in-person care and support are centred at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital, they support families from across the province.

SASKATOON & AREA

Palliative Care
End of Life Resources for Bereaved Families
Bereavement is a crucial piece of patient-centred care. In the tragic event that a family loses a child, a sustainable bereavement program needs to be in place at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital. Staff can now offer families comfort by providing them with resources and memories to honour their children and to feel supported in their grief once they leave the hospital.

Child Life
Increased Funding for Music Therapy
Music Therapy can help with pain reduction, increasing positive coping skills, creating opportunities for socialization, emotional and self-expression, anxiety reduction and developmental stimulation, improving fine/gross motor skills and more. These additional funds are allowing the Music Therapist at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital to work more hours, including group therapy sessions.

Community

  • Holiday Giving for the Loft
  • Air Canada Transport Program
  • Hospital Enrichment
  • Professional Development

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program
Seeing and Moving: A Visual Vestibular
This course aims to help increase the understanding of the visual and vestibular system and provide more researched-based treatment approaches for children with differences in processing this type of sensory information from their environments.

Acute Care Pediatrics
“FEES” for Pediatric Swallowing Disorders
The “FEES” (fiberoptic endoscopic swallow evaluation) program provides the pediatric population with a method of assessing swallow function without exposure to radiation. It is a gold standard approach to assessing and diagnosing swallowing disorders in pediatric patients.

Cardiology
Sonography Course
This nationally and internationally recognized course covers all aspects of echocardiography. It includes a selection of video cases of normal and abnormal echocardiographic examinations, in particular with reference to newer techniques that are having more applications in pediatric echocardiography.

General Pediatrics
Grand Rounds: Visiting Lecturer Program (Yr. 3 of 3)
The Visiting Lecturer Program will consist of 9 – 12 visiting speakers per year from across Canada and the United States. Lecturers will be identified based on their clinical, research, and advocacy expertise, and will be vetted by the Grant Rounds committee and/or other Departmental members.

SOS Approach to Feeding Conference (2 attendees)
This conference is designed to educate professionals in various disciplines about an evidence-based assessment and treatment program for kids with feeding-related challenges.

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
Johns Hopkins Critical Care Rehabilitation Conference
The 8th annual Johns Hopkins Critical Care Rehabilitation Conference offers the specific education required to provide excellent connected care for the children of Saskatchewan. The objectives of the conference include: description and discussion of how to change PICU clinical practice to implement early rehabilitation programs, provision of strategies to engage critically ill patients and their families for activity and mobility and education around communication and psychology-based strategies for the above. Instruction around the management of sedation and delirium for pediatric patients to promote PICU mobility is also included. Gaining the knowledge in these areas would make a huge impact in providing the best care to our pediatric patients in Saskatchewan.

Saskatchewan Health Authority
CAPWHN Conference (Yr. 1 of 10)
The Canadian Association of Perinatal and Women’s Health Nurses (CAPWHN) represents women’s health, obstetric and newborn nurses from across Canada. CAPWHN aims to promote excellence in nursing practice, leadership, education and research in the areas of perinatal and women’s health care.

Children’s Healthcare Canada Annual Conference (Yr. 1 of 5)
Children’s Healthcare Canada is the only national association that enables local improvements and contributes to system-wide change by building communities across the full continuum of care. This conference is the largest annual meeting of the child and youth healthcare provider community in Canada. It engages a broad stakeholder group of around 400 delegates that include hospital CEOs, CFOs, Senior Administrators, Physicians, Clinical Directors, Multidisciplinary Practitioners, Policy Makers, Researchers, Families, Youth and more.

CPPC & CHC Board and Membership Fees
This annual conference is the largest annual meeting of the child and youth healthcare provider community in Canada. It engages broad stakeholder groups including Hospital CEOs, Chief Financial Officers, Senior Administrators, Physicians, Clinical Directors, Multidisciplinary Practitioners, Policy Makers, Researchers, Families, Youth and many others.

Visit to IWK: Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Program
Provincial Pediatric Hematology Oncology transitioned from the Saskatoon Cancer Clinic and began operation at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital when the doors to our new hospital opened in 2019. The co-location of inpatient and outpatient hematology oncology care for children within our building provides the opportunity to establish a robust and excellent local program, as well as a provincial program with Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital as the hub for service delivery. A site visit to IWK Centre to learn about their program will help us ensure the best delivery of services possible.

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Capital Disbursements

Opened September 29, 2019, Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital offers state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for children, mothers, and families from across our province. Centrally located on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon, our new children’s hospital offers neonatal intensive care, pediatric intensive care, and general pediatrics, pediatric emergency and ambulatory services. Maternal services include labour and delivery, antepartum, and postpartum. The 176-bed facility provides the highest quality of care and puts Saskatchewan at the forefront of research and innovation.

Research

“Research Chair”
$100,000 restricted allocated for the initiation of a Pediatric Research Chair.

“Facilitators and Barriers to the Breastfeeding Practices of Refugee Mothers”
Dr. Shela Hirani, Faculty of Nursing, University of Regina
Breastfeeding is an essential and complete source of nutrition to promote young children’s growth and development. Supporting breastfeeding practices of women is vital to reduce the number of child deaths and illnesses. Saskatchewan has had a noticeable increase in refugee population with young children who were forced to flee their country of origin and seek refuge in Canada for their safety and well-being. Refugee mothers as one of the vulnerable groups are at high risk to discontinue their breastfeeding practices if they lack access to need based services or adequate support in healthcare settings of their host country. This research intends to give voice to breastfeeding refugee mothers who belong to diverse cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds, and are accessing and utilizing healthcare services in Saskatchewan. This project intends to uncover a range of factors that facilitate or hinder breastfeeding practices of refugee mothers accessing and utilizing healthcare services in Saskatchewan. This study will be undertaken in three main cities of Saskatchewan, including Regina, Prince Albert and Saskatoon. Refugee mothers with young children (age range 1 day to 24 months) will be eligible to participate in the study regardless of their breastfeeding practices. Our research will help health care providers, policy makers, and healthcare settings in Saskatchewan to develop need-based breastfeeding support interventions to protect breastfeeding practices of refugee mothers and improve the well-being of young children.

“Supporting Caregivers of Children and Adolescents with Mental Health and Addiction Disorders”
Dr. Hua Li, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan
For children and adolescents with mental health and addiction (MHA) disorders, their caregivers (most commonly parents) are a lifelong resource and play a vital role in supporting and helping them to make progress toward a recovery goal. Although family caregivers are the backbone of the healthcare system, providing unpaid care, mostly in the community, they receive very little support. They often bear an increasing amount of distress and experience poor mental and physical health. With growing evidence that children’s and adolescents’ well-being is significantly affected by their caregivers’ mental health, the well-being of caregivers should be placed as a top priority in improving the quality of care for children and adolescents with MHA disorders. To support caregivers of children and adolescents with MHA disorders, an interdisciplinary research team, consisting of a patient family advisory member, mental health nurses, a decision-maker, and researchers, will collaborate with the MHA Services in Saskatoon, and a local application-developer, Refresh Enterprises, to develop and test a smartphone app that we hope will improve caregiver wellness, social connectedness, and life satisfaction. We plan to build a community of caregivers where individuals can obtain information and support and navigate healthcare services through this innovative internet-based smartphone tool. This project has great potential to impact the health of Saskatchewan residents as unquestionably, when caregivers remain healthy and productive in their roles, this has an immediate impact on health care costs, quality of life for both caregivers and their children, and the health of communities.

“Oral Health as a Determinant of Childhood Arthritis Occurrence and Outcomes: Towards Improving Care of Childhood Arthritis by Optimizing Oral Health”
Dr. Alan Rosenberg, Department of Pediatrics, University of Saskatchewan
The goal of this research is to investigate a connection between diseases affecting the teeth, gums and jaw and childhood arthritis occurrence, treatment responses, and outcomes. There is evidence in adults that diseases affecting the teeth and gums can be associated with arthritis. However, there is very little information about the relationship between oral health status and childhood arthritis. This project’s overarching aim is to learn more about the relationships between oral health and childhood arthritis. This new information from this novel research is expected to show that optimizing oral health in children with arthritis will improve the arthritis.

The study’s objectives are to learn if diseases of the teeth, gums and jaw are: common in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA); associated with more aggressive JIA disease activity, poorer response to therapy, and less favourable arthritis outcomes; associated with certain infections in the mouth; and, more prevalent in children with JIA who have associated damage of the jaw joint due to arthritis.

The aims of this research are to: determine the frequency of dental cavities, gum inflammation, and jaw joint disease in children with JIA; and, determine if oral health status and the population of bacteria in the mouth are associated with more aggressive joint disease and less favourable arthritis treatment response and outcomes in JIA.

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation disbursed $24,394,011 in urgent maternal and pediatric needs between August 1, 2018, and July 31, 2019. In addition, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exceptional emerging researchers and research needs.

Equipment/Technology

PROVINCIAL

Maternal
BabyLeo Incubator
Sometimes babies need help to grow and thrive, especially if they were born too early. An incubator is used to provide a newborn baby the environmental conditions they need to get the best start. The BabyLeo Incubator keeps our littlest patients warm so they can grow.

SASKATOON & AREA

Maternal
C-MAC Video Laryngoscope
Laryngoscopes are used to give healthcare providers a view of the larynx and are often used in emergency situations when a patient needs help breathing. The C-MAC is a small, flexible and portable laryngoscope that is perfect for emergency, trauma and difficult intubations, and makes it easier for doctors to see what’s happening.

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
C-MAC Video Laryngoscope & Accessories
Laryngoscopes are used to give healthcare providers a view of the larynx and are often used in emergency situations when a patient needs help breathing. The C-MAC is a small, flexible and portable laryngoscope that is perfect for emergency, trauma and difficult intubations, and makes it easier for doctors to see what’s happening.

Fellowship

Dr. Lo
Pediatric Anesthesiology Fellowship
A Pediatric Anesthesia Fellowship is an education and training program in all aspects of pediatric anesthesia. This includes pediatric pain management and perioperative anesthetic care for neonates, infants, children and adolescents. Once this fellowship is complete, Dr. Lo will be returning to Saskatchewan to establish a full-time Anesthesiology practice for a minimum of one-year.

Dr. Streilein
Arizona Centre for Integrative Medicine
Integrative Medicine takes into account the whole person, including all aspects of their lifestyle, emphasizing the relationship between healthcare provider and the patient.

Patient Care

PROVINCIAL

Community
LGBTQ+ Rainbow Coffee Club
A weekly program for LGBTQ+ youth and their families and allies in Humboldt, SK. The group is a place for youth and their allies to come together in a safe and supportive environment.

SASKATOON & AREA

General Pediatrics
Maternal Infant Child Youth Research Network (MICYRN)|
The Maternal Infant Child and Youth Research Network (MICYRN) is a federal not-for-profit, charitable organization that builds capacity for high quality applied health research. It links 20 maternal and child health organizations based at academic health centres in Canada; is affiliated with more than 20 practice-based research networks; provides support to new and emerging teams, and has established strong national and international partnerships. MICYRN is unique in the world for this type of collaborative engagement. Working together in coordinated fashion enables the sharing of innovations and reduces duplication of effort and resource use, which means more funds, can be spent on doing research.

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
Cardiohelp Lung Support System (Saskatoon Radiothon 2018)
This critical piece of equipment will help save the lives of children suffering from respiratory failure who have not responded to standard treatments. It is extremely useful in cases such as severe influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia, which often results in children needing to be ventilated, suffering from severely low oxygen, and spending time in PICU. Influenza A has devastatingly resulted in the deaths of several Saskatchewan children this flu season, and the need for the Cardiohelp machine has never been higher.

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital
Hospital Opening Swag for Staff
In preparation for the opening of Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital, t-shirts and logoed water bottles were purchased for the staff of the new hospital.

Community
Holiday Giving for the Loft
Air Canada Transport Program
Hospital Enrichment
Healthy Mom Healthy Baby

Professional Development

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program
8th International Conference on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
Assessments and diagnosis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder require an in-depth understanding of prenatal brain development, early childhood development, and factors that can impact development. In 2016, new diagnostic criteria were released, requiring a more specific assessment in terms of executive functioning, attention and concentration, as well as childhood mental health. Attendance at this conference provided an efficient way to reconnect with the leading researchers in the area and review the most up-to-date and relevant research.

Pediatric Dysphagia Symposium
Nutritional adequacy and safety with eating and drinking are key elements of short and long-term outcomes in children. It is critical that members of the Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program Feeding Team know the benefits and risks of treatment options to help guide families and local teams to make the best decisions for their unique children.

Innovations Conference
This annual conference hosted by the Regina Therapeutic Recreation Association allows attendees the opportunity to ensure they are up to date with recreation therapy interventions, practices and research. The theme of this year’s Innovations Conference is Leisure Education & The Steps to Connect Program.

Care of the Hospitalized Child Conference (2)
The Care of the Hospitalized Child Conference addresses best practices in the care of this unique patient population. It allows attendees to identify early warning signs of clinical deterioration in the hospitalized child, fine-tune assessment skills, nursing care and understanding of treatment strategies for acutely and chronically ill children.

General Pediatrics
3rd International Conference on Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury
This conference cover a comprehensive cross-section of pediatric brain injury topics, including rehabilitation, family support, evidence-based research and mTBI and concussions in pediatrics. This conference is especially relevant to the Acquired Brain Injury Outreach Program, as this program focuses on facilitating the best quality of life following brain injury across all domains.

Canadian Assoc. of Genetic Counsellors Annual Conference (2)
This conference provides updates on new genetic testing technology which can be used to provide a diagnosis for families for whom we have not found a diagnosis, use of social media in practice, new areas of practice such as pharmacogenetics and discussion on the ethics of the emerging technology. The program provides genetic counsellors from across the country with up-to-date and relevant education on new findings in genetics that help provide better care to families.

Pediatric Feeding & Swallowing Clinic
The Approach to Feeding program is an effective way to address problematic feeding behaviors in a variety of settings and populations. The SOS Approach uses a transdisciplinary team approach which assesses the “whole child”: organ systems, muscles, development, sensory processing, oral-motor skills, learning, behavior and cognition, nutrition and the environment. The goal of SOS is to establish healthy eating patterns in the pediatric population by supporting families to introduce a variety of foods from all food groups.

Ketogenic Diet Conference
The Ketogenic Diet is a diet therapy treatment that is scientifically proven as an effective treatment for seizures, particularly in children. The Ketogenic Diet Conference is designed as a training course and networking opportunity for healthcare professionals administering the ketogenic diet to patients with epilepsy and other disorders where the ketogenic diet is indicated.

Closing the Gap Conference (2)
Closing the Gap Conference: Continuing Education in Alternative and Augmentative Communication allows attendees to network with other professionals, increase knowledge in this specialty area of practice and bring home information and strategies that can be shared with coworkers. Closing the Gap is one of the largest, most respected AAC conferences in North America.

Grand Rounds – Visiting Lecturer Program (Yr 2 of 3)
The Visiting Lecturer Program will consist of 9 – 12 visiting speakers per year from across Canada and the United States. Lecturers will be identified based on their clinical, research, and advocacy expertise, and will be vetted by the Grant Rounds committee and/or other Departmental members.

SHA Request
CAPHC and CPPC
This annual conference is the largest annual meeting of the child and youth healthcare provider community in Canada. It engages broad stakeholder groups including Hospital CEOs, Chief Financial Officers, Senior Administrators, Physicians, Clinical Directors, Multidisciplinary Practitioners, Policy Makers, Researchers, Families, Youth and many others.

CAPWHN Conference (3)
The Canadian Association of Perinatal and Women’s Health Nurses (CAPWHN) represents women’s health, obstetric and newborn nurses from across Canada. CAPWHN aims to promote excellence in nursing practice, leadership, education and research in the areas of perinatal and women’s health care.

Indigenous Children’s Health Conference (2)
This conference was designed for community members, researchers, academics and clinicians. It is the only conference dedicated to the health and well-being of First Nations, Inuit, Métis, American Indian, Alaska Native and other Indigenous children and youth in North America and around the world.

PMI North Saskatchewan Professional Development Day
The PMI North Saskatchewan Professional Development Day is a full day conference with world-class keynote speakers. Session topics cover technical, leadership, and strategic and business management topics.

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Capital Disbursements

Opening in late 2019, the new Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital will offer state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for children, mothers, and families from across our province. Centrally located on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon, our new children’s hospital will offer neonatal intensive care, pediatric intensive care, and general pediatrics, pediatric emergency and ambulatory services. Maternal services will include labour and delivery, antepartum, and postpartum. The 176-bed facility will provide the highest quality of care and put Saskatchewan at the forefront of research and innovation.

Research

Research Chair
$100,000 restricted allocated for the initiation of a Pediatric Research Chair.

“CHAMPS – Activity Monitoring Program”
Dr. Tim Bradley, Department of Pediatrics
Congenital heart defects are one of the leading types of birth anomaly. Affected children can have abnormal arterial growth and development before and after birth producing increased stiffness of the arterial wall, a well-established risk factor for early onset of adult cardiovascular diseases like heart attacks and strokes. These children can also be of smaller stature, less physically active and at risk for mental health issues. Currently, no chronic disease management program addresses these health needs of the approximately 2400 affected children across Saskatchewan.
Building on previous work funded by Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation, more affected children are being recruited and their cardiovascular health, body composition, physical activity levels and psychological health will be monitored over the next 3 years. Baseline comprehensive assessments are performed in conjunction with an annual summer camp and compared to data from healthy age- and sex-matched children. Baseline testing includes basic heart, blood vessel and exercise measures to assess cardiovascular health; scans to assess body composition, bone and muscle health; interviews and accelerometry to assess physical activity levels; and questionnaires to assess psychological health. Annual re-testing will then be performed in conjunction with regular clinical follow-up visits. Our long-term goals are to identify which of these children will most benefit from exercise and lifestyle interventions as they transition into adulthood.
This project will be the first of its kind to provide comprehensive long-term monitoring of the physical and psychological health of these children. This new and innovative program tailored to each individual affected child’s health concerns, could then be used as a model to develop a Canada-wide chronic disease management program for children with congenital heart defects to optimize their growth, psychological and long-term cardiovascular health.

“The Chronic Pain Network”
Dr. Krista Baerg, Department of Pediatrics, University of Saskatchewan
Chronic pain is common and results in high healthcare utilization and lost productivity. This network will establish provincial patient registries and national clinical trials collaborative. The project will develop the infrastructure and momentum required to progress chronic pain research in Saskatchewan. The opportunity to participate in clinical trials will enable patients to access new treatments while treating those patients appropriately and safety. Many partnerships will exist nationally, provincially, within health regions and universities. This is a national collaborative spearheaded by internationally respected pain researchers.

“Connecting to Care: Uniting Patients, Families and Practitioners Through a Plan of Care Portal”
Dr. Tracie Risling, University of Saskatchewan
Hospital stays can be very overwhelming for both children and their family caregivers. Surroundings are unfamiliar; there are many members of the care team and a lot of information to try to remember. Research has shown that having access to information can help patients and caregivers feel more engaged in care, be more active in decision-making, and in general feel more satisfied with the hospital experience. Electronic patient portals are a new way to provide this essential information directly to patients or caregivers. These portals can be accessed on a tablet or other mobile device and can be very effective in influencing engagement and communication with the care team. Research has been done on patient portals with adult participants but the use of this technology for pediatric patients is very new.

This project will give families an opportunity to work in collaboration with the research team, healthcare practitioners, and software developers to create a new Plan of Care Portal (POCP) designed specifically for the Children’s Hospital of Saskatchewan. The research project is planned for three years, and will be done in three phases. Family caregivers and healthcare practitioners will contribute their ideas to the design of the POCP in the first phase of the project. Next, technology experts in the health region and project software developers will work to build and test the POCP. In the final phase, the research team will partner with nurses and family caregivers to evaluate the POCP over a six-month pilot period in the acute care setting. Select nurses will have tablet devices to offer the caregivers of patients under their care. If they choose to participate, the caregivers will use the portal and answer survey questions about the experience. Data logged during portal use will also help complete the evaluation.

“Early Recognition of Neonatal HIE Through Urine Metabolomics”
Dr. Salah Almubarak, Department of Pediatrics
Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) can be devastating in newborns and has the potential to cause serious long-term disability. Hence, early recognition and introduction of appropriate treatment is crucial. Halting of HIE progression is important in preventing long-term complications. Early application of therapeutic hypothermia has become a standard of care especially within the first 6 hours of life; however, not all cases of neonates with HIE are recognized at an early stage despite intensive clinical monitoring. Often clinical evidence of HIE does not manifest in the first 24 hours of life when interventions are needed. As such, there are too many infants that go on to have severe brain injury (e.g. cerebral palsy). We need a better screening tool to guide earlier diagnosis and prevention of HIE progression. Metabolomics is the study of small molecules created by cell activity. In disease states, cells produce different chemical substances, which can be measured in a human body. Researchers aim to discover novel biological markers by using urine metabolomic analysis and comparing it to neonatal Electroencephalogram (EEG), in order to recognize HIE at early stage from birth and introduce therapeutic hypothermia to improve long-term neonatal outcome.

“Indigenous Women’s Perspective for Secure Birth Places”
Dr. Angela Bowen, University of Saskatchewan
Indigenous women’s perspective for culturally secure birthing practices is a participatory research project that engages women in an Indigenous Women’s Birth Network to increase our understanding of culturally secure birth. The network will support women sharing their individual stories about their baby’s birth, participating in a talking circle, interpreting the study findings, and developing a photo/voice learning resource to increase the cultural competence and humility of care providers involved in maternity care. The project aims to enhance the maternal healthcare of Indigenous women that will in turn impact the health of the child and growing family.

“PreGain Bone Health Study”
Dr. Munier Nour, Department of Pediatrics
Anorexia nervosa is a condition of severe low body weight. It often occurs in adolescence at a critical time for bone development. Adolescent females with anorexia nervosa are well known to be at risk for bone loss and bone fragility (osteoporosis). This is a result of a number of hormonal changes that occur in response to inadequate nutritional intake. Estrogen deficiency is thought to be a major contributor to the bone loss. Unfortunately, most studies that have attempted to replace estrogen in pill format in those with anorexia have not shown benefits to bone health. Recent developments to replace estrogen through topical application (transdermal) have shown promising results for bone health. Currently, no proven treatment or prevention therapy has been approved for optimizing bone health in young females with anorexia and new, effective strategies are desperately needed.

This study will assess bone health in 24 Saskatchewan adolescent females aged 12-20 years old with anorexia nervosa. Half will receive the topical estrogen. All participants will have their bone health assessed at the beginning of the study and at four other times over a 24-month period. Participants will fill out questionnaires and complete a bone density scan, spine x-rays, blood tests and new state of the art high resolution bone imaging techniques.

Through this study, we will gain a greater understanding of bone health in girls with anorexia. Additionally, this study may provide evidence for future therapies.

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation disbursed $8,739,686 in urgent maternal and pediatric needs between August 1, 2017 and July 31, 2018. In addition, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exceptional emerging researchers and research needs.

Education

 

PROVINCIAL

PICU Transport Team
Airborn Neonatal & Pediatric Transport Conference
This conference is uniquely designed, specifically for neonatal and pediatric transport professionals. It provides educational lectures on innovative approaches and relates the latest advances in neonatal and pediatric transport from experts around the world.

NICU Transport Team
Airborn Neonatal & Pediatric Transport Conference
This conference is uniquely designed, specifically for neonatal and pediatric transport professionals. It provides educational lectures on innovative approaches and relates the latest advances in neonatal and pediatric transport from experts around the world.

 

SASKATOON & AREA

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program
Cerebral Palsy & Developmental Medicine Conference
This conference is the ideal opportunity to understand Cerebral Palsy Hip Surveillance protocol creation and implementation. In conjunction with the Pediatric Orthopedic surgeons, there is a plan to design a Saskatchewan provincial program that will improve existing hip and spine surveillance.

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program
Pediatric Gait Analysis and Orthotic Management
This course will allow Saskatchewan children with movement disorders receive the best care available when it comes to management of their lower extremity orthotics and maximizing their functions in terms of gait. This complex course offers hands on practice, interactive learning, and discussion of case studies helping train therapists in required measurements and calculations.

Emergency
National Emergency Nurses Association Conference
This conference covers best practice for situations commonly found in Pediatric Emergency Departments. Topics included concussion, cognitive bias, intentional vs. unintentional injuries, recognizing patterns of injury, patient flow, and more.

Fellowship
Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Fellowship
Dr. Weiler will be working with the Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Clinic at SickKids Hospital to gain skills in assessment and medicolegal report writing in cases of suspected child maltreatment. Saskatoon & area has been without a Specialist in Child Maltreatment for more than 10 years. Dr. Weiler has shown great passion and commitment to this area, and will be returning to Saskatoon upon completion of his Fellowship to open a child maltreatment clinic/service for the new Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital.

Fellowship
Maternal Fetal Medicine
Dr. Lane is mid-way through a 2 year Fellowship in Maternal Fetal Medicine at the University of Manitoba. This Fellowship involves extra training in high-risk obstetrics, diagnosis and management of obstetrical complications, and obstetrical ultrasound. Saskatoon has a busy Obstetrical and Fetal Assessment Unit, which will allow Dr. Lane to put training into clinical practice on a daily basis upon her return.

Fellowship
Pediatric Anesthesiology
Dr. Munshey is participating in a ACGME accredited Fellowship that will provide comprehensive clinical experience in Pediatric Anesthesia allowing Dr. Munshey to acquire knowledge, skills, and attributes necessary to become a Perioperative Consultant in Pediatric Anesthesia. Training includes all subspecialties of pediatric anesthesia, pain management, regional anesthesia, critical care, and more.

Maternal
CAPWHN Conference
The conference helps provide patients with the most up-to-date, evidence-based nursing care providing tools and strategies to improve the quality of perinatal and women’s health nursing care and safety. A large component in this year’s conference is breastfeeding and supporting parents.

Maternal
MothersFirst Maternal Mental Health Conference
Attending this conference helped members of the Maternal Services team better understand identifying risk factors for maternal depression as well as the effects of untreated maternal depression on mothers and children. Maternal mental health was identified as an important area to develop by the Patient Family Advisory Council.

Pediatrics
Dept. of Pediatrics Grand Rounds: Visiting Lecturer Program
The Visiting Lecturer Program will consist of 9 – 12 visiting speakers per year from across Canada and the United States. Lecturers will be identified based on their clinical, research, and advocacy expertise, and will be vetted by the Grant Rounds committee and/or other Departmental members.

Pediatrics
Heart Rhythm Scientific Sessions
This conference provides the most scientific content and presentation of leading edge research in the area of inherited heart rhythm conditions. It is an important chance to meet colleagues and develop a network of people in the cardiac genetic field.

Pediatrics
Pediatric Echosonography Course
This course covers cardiac embryology; the normal fetal and postnatal heart and their circulations; hemodynamics; scanning views and techniques; congenital and acquired cardiac pathology and its appearance on the echocardiogram.

Pediatrics
CAPHC Conference
The CAPHC Conference is held annually and brings together managers, senior administrators, and physicians, clinical and operational directors from children’s hospitals across Canada. The theme of this year’s conference is “Engaging Children, Youth, and Family: Are You Ready to Move Beyond Good Intentions?” Attendees learned to take the next steps toward making patient and family engagement a reality.

Pediatrics
11th Annual International Forum on Pediatric Pain
The Interdisciplinary Pediatric Pain Clinic was established in 2009. The team has worked together to establish a successful clinic, the only one of its kind in Saskatchewan and services the province; 40% of patients are from outside Saskatoon and area. Chronic pain affects 10-38% of children and 5% of children have pain related disability. The Pediatric Pain Clinic’s team will benefit from the 11th annual International Forum on Pediatric Pain.

Pediatrics
Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors Annual Conference
This conference provides education around the most current information regarding genetic conditions and gentic testing technology. It provides a unique opportunity for networking with other Genetic Counsellors.

PICU
Canadian Apheresis Group Annual General Meeting
Training for the Apheresis Program in PICU in Saskatoon began August 2015. The team includes 3 lead physicians and 14 RN operators. Since the program began, the team has provided over 150 treatments on 11 patients. The opportunity for team members to attend this conference and learn outcomes from case studies from other centers is invaluable to the program.

Pediatrics
Perinatal Loss Conference & Working Group
The Department of Maternal Services in Saskatoon has the highest number of deliveries in the province at approximately 5,600 births. Of these yearly deliveries, around 50 of them are losses; thereby requiring that nurses provide supportive care to the grieving family. This conference and working group was developed to provide the most appropriate tools and resources to nurses to better manage perinatal loss and support grieving families.

Pediatrics
Child Health Trainee Research Fund
The Child Health Trainee Research Fund was created to further enhance and expand child health research within the Department of Pediatrics and University of Saskatchewan. In particular, the Department is intent on expanding opportunities for research training at the undergraduate and post-graduate levels thus ensuring trainees contribute to the generation of new knowledge through research.

Pediatrics
SOS Approach to Feeding Workshop
Early positive feeding experiences are fundamental to the healthy development and growth of all children. Early identification and resolution of feeding difficulties is crucial to many areas of development as well as preserving positive family dynamics. The area of pediatric feeding and swallowing is very specialized and requires additional training to build on what Speech-Language Pathologists learn during their Master’s degree.

Pediatrics
UpToDate Subscription
UpToDate ™ is the most widely recognized electronic clinical care reference database in the world. It offers frequently updated, evidence based reviews that ensure the most current information is being applied to patient care.

Pediatrics
Western Canada Pediatric GI Conference
This weekend conference brings together Pediatric GI team members including specialists, physicians, nurses, dietitians, and more. The goal is to collaborate, educate, and share information surrounding IBD, celiac disease, and other general GI issues.

Pediatrics
Association for Educators of Children with Medical Needs Conference
Attendees of this conference are all teachers of students with medical health needs and are employed at various children’s hospitals or pediatric departments across North America. Topics at this year’s conference include working with students who have hematology/oncology conditions; have suffered a traumatic brain injury; have cystic fibrosis, eating disorders, or other chronic health conditions; and are dealing with challenges for students returning to school after pediatric cancer.

Rheumatology
Sponsorship of the Pediatric Rheumatology Program
The Pediatric Rheumatology Program at the University of Saskatchewan hosted a project orientation workshop on May 2018. This program is used to heighten awareness of childhood arthritis in Saskatchewan and promote research.

 

 

Equipment

PROVINCIAL

NICU Transport
Criticool Mini
Hyperthermia has been shown to be associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes in neonates with moderate to severe HIE. Hyperthermia therapy is critical to avoid further potential brain injury or death to the infant. This technology allows nurses to start the cooling process immediately, and makes a huge difference in the cognitive future of infants, reducing mortality rates in our youngest population.

PICU Transport
Transport Ventilator
Before the purchase of this transport ventilator, the PICU transport team only had one transport ventilator that had to be shared between the day team and night team. Due to overlap between the day and night teams, one team often had to go without a ventilator. That meant that the team had to use a breathing bag. While breathing bags can work, they leave room for human error, as each breath must be the exact same. The purchase of an additional transport ventilator ensures that each breath is timed perfectly with the right pressure.

PICU Transport
Transport Isolette
The transport isolette helps stabilize a baby’s temperature during transport in up to 40-degree weather. This piece of equipment is extremely vital to keep such small patients warm, especially during cold Saskatchewan winters. Because each isolette operates differently it adds stress and learning time for the Pediatric Transport Team when trying to treat and stabilize a patient. Having an isolette that is dedicated for use by the transport team will allow the team to focus on treating the patient. The isolette will also be compatible with the transport ventilator and work together to stabilize and support vulnerable young patients.

 

SASKATOON & AREA

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program
Augmentative Alternative Communications Equipment
Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program has acquired a variety of communication devices to create an assessment station. This station will provide a wide variety of devices for therapists to try with clients. These communication devices improve the quality of life of the patients, providing them with access to communication. Communication allows us to interact with our environments and impact our world. These communication devices empower patients to: make requests, reject ideas and objects, comment, question, protest, and inform.

Maternal
BiliBlanket Meter II Checker
The BiliBlanket Meter II Checker is used to ensure that the BiliBlanket and BiliSoft blanket is emitting enough irradiance to treat newborn jaundice. Jaundice is a yellowing of the skin and eye of newborns, which is caused by a buildup of bilirubin in the blood system. Almost 60% of term newborns are affected by jaundice, and 2% are at risk for severe jaundice.

Maternal
LigAsure FT Series Covidien Energy Platform
At the time of delivery, blood flow to the uterus is extraordinary. In a situation where the bleeding at delivery is excessive and life threatening, this equipment is used to minimize blood loss, allowing surgeons to move more quickly in controlling bleeding. This can help to decrease the need for blood transfusion, allowing new moms to breastfeed and bond with their new baby more readily.

Pediatric Outpatients
Nox T3 Sleep Study Devices
Pediatric patients with untreated sleep apnea can have problems with daytime behaviour and attention span. It can also affect brain development and lead to heart failure. Children with obstructive sleep apnea require diagnostic tests and treatments different from that of adults and it is important to obtain an accurate diagnosis. The addition of two Nox T3 Sleep Study Devices will significantly expand the current pediatric sleep study program in Saskatoon. This program is the only place for pediatric sleep studies for children in central and northern Saskatchewan and runs sleep studies 7 days a week. Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea occurs when a child’s breathing becomes partially or completely blocked repeatedly during sleep.

NICU
Neonatal Bronchoscope
The Division of Pediatric Anesthesia provides perioperative anesthetic care for children from newborns to teenagers. Unfortunately, there was no bronchoscope for newborn babies. Using a bronchoscope that is too large can cause scarring of the trachea. A 2.2mm bronchoscope will allow health care workers to place breathing tubes that are an appropriate size for newborn babies.

NICU
CMAC Video Laryngoscope
On some of the smallest patients in Saskatchewan, there is absolutely no room for error when doctors intubate to help babies breathe. This portable and flexible system is perfect for emergency, trauma, and difficult intubations. This pocket-sized laryngoscope makes it easier for doctors to see what’s happening, which means it’s easier on tiny patients whose heads are often smaller than the palm of your hand!

NICU
TCM Combi Monitoring System
Conventional blood oxygen measurement systems can cause significant blood loss and pose an infection risk for babies. The TCM Combi Monitoring System is a “no pokes” machine that uses a simple sensor placed on an infant’s skin, providing non-invasive monitoring of their blood oxygen levels in a situation where every second counts. The primary goal in the care of sick premature babies is to ensure adequate oxygen supply to their tissue and vital organs. If changing levels go undetected, they can cause severe cerebral damage.

Pediatrics
InTouch Vita Robots
Thanks to support from the RBC Foundation, JPCHF was able to purchase two InTouch Vita Robots for Northern Saskatchewan. These robots will be stations in Prince Albert and le-à-la-Crosse while one robot will be non-static, moving between locations as required. The InTouch Vita Robots allows physicians to interact directly with patients in real time through a smartphone or tablet. It offers local health teams a simple solution to assess, manage, triage, and transport pediatric patients before and after hospitalization.

Pediatrics
MRI Compatible Anaesthesia Machine
Not all anaesthesia equipment is safe for use during an MRI and can interfere with the quality of the MRI image, cause damage to the MRI equipment, or hurt the patient or health care workers. In cases where a pediatric patient must be put under for an MRI or procedure, having an MRI compatible anaesthesia machine is critical. The special equipment does not interfere with the image quality or equipment and is safe for the patients and staff involved.

 

 

Patient Care

PROVINCIAL

Pediatric Oncology
Support of Synergy 8 Community Builders and the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency

Pediatrics
CHAMPS Camp

 

REGINA & AREA

Pediatric Palliative Care
Creating Lasting Legacies
Technological advances in children’s health have greatly improved medical care and outcomes; however children continue to have incurable diseases that result in death. The number of Canadian children who received specialized pediatric palliative care between 2002 and 2012 has increased four-fold. This number will continue to grow. Legacy building helps health care providers assist parents, siblings, and the ill child to co-create memories and confirm that the dying child is loved and remembered. This project is contributing to the overall health of the family unit when a child is identified as requiring palliative care services.

 

SASKATOON & AREA

Pediatrics
MICYRN Partnership (3-year)
The Maternal Infant Child and Youth Research Network (MICYRN) is a federal not-for-profit, charitable organization that builds capacity for high quality applied health research. It links 20 maternal and child health organizations based at academic health centres in Canada; is affiliated with more than 20 practice-based research networks; provides support to new and emerging teams; and has established strong national and international partnerships. MICYRN is unique in the world for this type of collaborative engagement. Working together in coordinated fashion enables the sharing of innovations and reduces duplication of effort and resource use, which means more funds, can be spent on doing research.

Air Canada Transport Program

Safety & Health Education – (5920) – $2,322

PEDS Playroom Grants for Regina and Saskatoon

 

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Capital Disbursements

Opening in late 2019, the new Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital will offer state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for children, mothers, and families from across our province. Centrally located on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon, our new children’s hospital will offer neonatal intensive care, pediatric intensive care, and general pediatrics, pediatric emergency and ambulatory services. Maternal services will include labour and delivery, antepartum, and postpartum. The 176-bed facility will provide the highest quality of care and put Saskatchewan at the forefront of research and innovation.

 

Research

“Research Chair”
$100,000 restricted allocated for the initiation of a Pediatric Research Chair.

“The Chronic Pain Network” – Dr. Krista Baerg, Department of Pediatrics and University of Saskatchewan
Chronic pain is common and results in high healthcare utilization and lost productivity. This network will establish provincial patient registries and national clinical trials collaborative. The project will develop the infrastructure and momentum required to progress chronic pain research in Saskatchewan. The opportunity to participate in clinical trials will enable patients to access new treatments while treating those patients appropriately and safety. Many partnerships will exist nationally, provincially, within health regions and universities. This is a national collaborative spearheaded by internationally respected pain researchers.

“Indigenous Women’s Perspectives for Culturally Secure Birth Practices” – Dr. Angela Bowen, University of Saskatchewan
Indigenous women’s perspective for culturally secure birthing practices is a participatory research project that engages women in an Indigenous Women’s Birth Network to increase our understanding of culturally secure birth. The network will support women sharing their individual stories about their baby’s birth, participating in a talking circle, interpreting the study findings, and developing a photo/voice learning resource to increase the cultural competence and humility of care providers involved in maternity care. The project aims to enhance the maternal healthcare of Indigenous women that will in turn impact the health of the child and growing family.

“CHAMPS: Children’s Healthy-Heart and Activity Monitoring Program in Saskatchewan” – Dr. Tim Bradley, Department of Pediatrics
Congenital heart defects are one of the leading types of birth anomaly. Affected children can have abnormal arterial growth and development before and after birth producing increased stiffness of the arterial wall, a well-established risk factor for early onset of adult cardiovascular diseases like heart attacks and strokes. These children can also be of smaller stature, less physically active and at risk for mental health issues. Currently, no chronic disease management program addresses these health needs of the approximately 2400 affected children across Saskatchewan.
Building on previous work funded by Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation, more affected children are being recruited and their cardiovascular health, body composition, physical activity levels and psychological health will be monitored over the next 3 years. Baseline comprehensive assessments are performed in conjunction with an annual summer camp and compared to data from healthy age- and sex-matched children. Baseline testing includes basic heart, blood vessel and exercise measures to assess cardiovascular health; scans to assess body composition, bone and muscle health; interviews and accelerometry to assess physical activity levels; and questionnaires to assess psychological health. Annual re-testing will then be performed in conjunction with regular clinical follow-up visits. Our long-term goals are to identify which of these children will most benefit from exercise and lifestyle interventions as they transition into adulthood.
This project will be the first of its kind to provide comprehensive long-term monitoring of the physical and psychological health of these children. This new and innovative program tailored to each individual affected child’s health concerns, could then be used as a model to develop a Canada-wide chronic disease management program for children with congenital heart defects to optimize their growth, psychological and long-term cardiovascular health.

“Connected to Care: Uniting Patients, Families, and Practitioners Through a Plan of Care Portal for the Children’s Hospital of SK” – Tracie Risling, University of Saskatchewan
Hospital stays can be very overwhelming for both children and their family caregivers. Surroundings are unfamiliar; there are many members of the care team and a lot of information to try to remember. Research has shown that having access to information can help patients and caregivers feel more engaged in care, be more active in decision-making, and in general feel more satisfied with the hospital experience. Electronic patient portals are a new way to provide this essential information directly to patients or caregivers. These portals can be accessed on a tablet or other mobile device and can be very effective in influencing engagement and communication with the care team. Research has been done on patient portals with adult participants but the use of this technology for pediatric patients is very new. This project will give families an opportunity to work in collaboration with the research team, healthcare practitioners, and software developers to create a new Plan of Care Portal (POCP) designed specifically for the Children’s Hospital of Saskatchewan. The research project is planned for three years, and will be done in three phases. Family caregivers and healthcare practitioners will contribute their ideas to the design of the POCP in the first phase of the project. Next, technology experts in the health region and project software developers will work to build and test the POCP. In the final phase, the research team will partner with nurses and family caregivers to evaluate the POCP over a six-month pilot period in the acute care setting. Select nurses will have tablet devices to offer the caregivers of patients under their care. If they choose to participate, the caregivers will use the portal and answer survey questions about the experience. Data logged during portal use will also help complete the evaluation.

“Intrauterine Inflammation as a Determinant of Pregnancy Outcome and Child Health” – Alan Rosenberg, Department of Pediatrics
The goal of this research is to improve understanding of the earliest origins of chronic diseases by studying how inflammation occurring during pregnancy can affect the occurrence of diseases in the child after birth. Chronic diseases in Canada and in Saskatchewan are major burdens for affected patients, their families, and society. Prematurity; obesity and obesity-related diseases, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease; asthma; bone and joint diseases; and nervous system disorders represent major health burdens. There is strong evidence that inflammation occurring during pregnancy can contribute to diseases developing later in the offspring’s life. In this study, we will identify factors in pregnant women, including blood markers and genetic characteristics that appear when inflammation is present. Having a panel of tests to detect inflammation during pregnancy will allow us to then study how inflammation during pregnancy is associated with premature birth, impaired development of the nervous system, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, reduced bone quality, and respiratory conditions such as asthma.
With this research, our Saskatchewan team will be able to lead Canadian and international collaborations to investigate how genetics, lifestyle factors (such as nutrition, physical activity and reduced stress) and avoiding certain environmental exposures can help reduce inflammation during pregnancy to prevent disease and ensure healthy children now and into their long-term futures.

“Randomized Controlled Trial of the Internet-delivered Preoperative Preparation Program (I-PPP)” – Kristi Wright, University of Regina
Thousands of children have surgery every year, and for many children this is a stressful experience. For example children may cry, kick, or even screaming during this experience and these behaviors are related to negative outcomes such as prolonging induction of anesthesia as well as difficulties following surgery (e.g., separation anxiety, bed wetting). Surgical preparation programs prior to day of surgery are one approach employed to help children who are having an upcoming surgery and their families. However, well-designed, thorough programs have not been well integrated into hospital practice, which may be due to their high costs and low feasibility. Using the Internet as a way prepare children for an upcoming surgery may be an attractive option to address the existing concerns with traditionally delivered programs (i.e., expensive). Specifically, using the Internet as a method to prepare children for surgery would make the preparation widely accessible to parents and children would decrease having to visit the hospital prior to the day of surgery, is relatively inexpensive, and has little impact on the busy day surgery setting. To address this need, we designed an interactive, Internet-delivered preoperative preparation program for both child and parent. The present study proposes to evaluate this accessible approach for the preparation of children (3-10 years old) for surgery. Children will be randomly assigned to receive treatment-as-usual, access to an Internet preparation program, or access to an Internet preparation program and also have a parent present during the anesthetic induction process. It is anticipated that children in the Internet preparation groups and their parents will have significantly less worries than the treatment as usual group during the day surgery experience, particularly during the most stressful time point (i.e., anesthetic induction). It is anticipated that our innovative approach to surgery preparation will aid in reducing both child and parent worries during the during the day surgery experience and overall improve our ability to provide the best care possible for children undergoing day surgery and their families at the Royal University Hospital and Children’s Hospital of Saskatchewan.

From August 1, 2016 to July 31, 2017 Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation distributed $1,648,569 for current maternal and pediatric needs. In addition, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exceptional emerging researchers and research needs.

Education

REGINA & AREA

Pediatric Speech Language
PROMPT: Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets Conference
The Conference provides a multi-dimensional approach to speech production disorders, which encompasses traditional physical-sensory aspects of motor planning and performance, and aims to include cognitive-linguist and social-emotional aspects of therapy.

SASKATOON & AREA

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Centre
Proven & Effective Play Therapy
This workshop educated attendees on how to use play therapy as an incredible method of communication and diagnostics, including how to interpret the ways in which children play, the importance of what they play with/create, and how to interpret their interactions with professionals.

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Centre
If You Can’t Breathe Course
This course educated attendees on how to integrate, cardiopulmonary and postural control strategies in the pediatric populations.

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Centre
School Based Mental Health Conference
This conference supported Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program Social Workers in providing generalized intervention supports for children and families around increasingly complex psychological and mental health concerns that arise from developmental disabilities.

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Centre
Feeding Therapy Course
This course helped the Feeding Team at Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program improve care being provided to children who attend the program.

Alvin Buckwold Child Development Centre
More Than Words Certification
This course educated staff at Alvin Buckwold Child Development Program on how to better work with young children with autism and their families.

Maternal
CAPWHN National Conference
The conference helps provide patients with the most up-to-date, evidence-based nursing care providing tools and strategies to improve the quality of perinatal and women’s health nursing care and safety.  A large component in this year’s conference is breastfeeding and supporting parents.

NICU
Airborne Neonatal & Pediatric Transport Conference
Medical transport of high-risk and critically ill newborns requires skilled personnel and specialized equipment. A significant number of neonates require emergency transfer to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Airborne conferences are uniquely designed, specifically for neonatal and pediatric transport professionals. It provides education on innovative approaches relating to the latest advances in neonatal and pediatric transport from experts around the world.

PICU
Advanced Practices on Child Maltreatment Conference
The conference allows caregivers access to valuable information and techniques in detecting child maltreatment.  In a hospital setting, PICU nurses are among the first to perform a thorough assessment of an injured child, giving an opportunity to observe interaction between family members.

CAPHC Membership
The Canadian Association of Pediatric Health Centres is a recognized leader and advocate for advancing the improvement of healthcare for Canada’s children and youth. The annual membership was purchased by J Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation.  Key provincial pediatric department heads support it.

CAPHC Conference
The CAPHC Annual Conference is one of the largest meetings of child and youth health service providers in Canada. Delegates from across the country take advantage of the opportunity to network with colleagues, learn from local and Pan-Canadian experts in child and youth health, and participate in exhibits.

Pediatric Trainee Research Fund
The Pediatric Trainee Research Fund to promote and facilitate child health related research. The program is to provide opportunities and mentoring that generates high quality, relevant research results. The research undertaken has prompt and direct impact on improving health. Trainees play integral roles in advancing these and other research agendas.  Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation supported this initiative in 2013 and 2014.

Visiting Lectureship Program
The Visiting Lectureship Program provides unique opportunities for internationally renowned child health practitioners, research scholars, and educators to visit the Department of Pediatrics. The visiting lecturers will interact with health care providers, trainees, the general public and administrators to impart their knowledge and provide new opportunities for further enhancing child health and family centered care in Saskatchewan fostering new collaborative research alliances.

WEDOC Conference 2017
Joint sponsorship opportunity between Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation and the Saskatoon Hospital Foundations. The Annual WEDOC Conference brings together healthcare professionals, administrators, and decision makers to discuss issues on ER flow.

Community
The Loft Program
Families in need receive food and gift hampers to help throughout the holiday season.

 

Equipment

PROVINCIAL

Pediatric Transport Team
Heated Humidified High-Flow Nasal Cannula
Heated Humidified High-Flow Nasal Cannula is used to provide non-invasive respiratory support to children across Saskatchewan, delivering oxygen and air in specific measurements to ensure adequate respiratory support to the patient.  This device will be utilized by the Pediatric Transport Team of Saskatchewan to bring a portable Intensive Care Unit to our province’s most vulnerable population.

Pediatric Transport Team
Pediatric Ambulance
Complete with infrared night vision to detect wildlife and a larger gas tank to reduce stops, the new ambulance replaces a previous model, which logged over 360,000kms. The new ambulance features two transport bays to allow the provincial Pediatric Transport Team to safely treat two patients at once. It also comes equipped with four seats so that parents are now able to travel with the medical team. This ambulance was purchased through a partnership between JPCHF, the Sandra Schmirler Foundation, and Synergy 8 Community Builders.

SASKATOON & AREA

Maternal
Bladder Scanner
Bladder scanners are used to assess and plan care for new mothers.  Often after deliveries, new mothers have trouble voiding.  When urinary retention persists for an extended period of time, it can lead to irreversible bladder damage.  The bladder scanned determines the amount of urine in the bladder and prevents unnecessary and often frequent catheterizations.  This equipment is used in conjunction with policies and procedures to promote safe, non-invasive care for new moms.

Maternal
Fetal Telemetry Units
Interventions in labour and birth cannot always be avoided, in which case it becomes necessary to monitor the fetus electronically. Although the fetus needs to be monitored in labour, Fetal Telemetry Units mean that the mother doesn’t have to be confined to a bed or restricted by wires or cords.  It is well understood that mothers who move in labour have shorter labours, a better ability to cope with labour main, and less risk of a variety of adverse complications, as well as decreased cost to the healthcare system in nursing hours, cost of medical intervention, and bed occupancy.

Maternal
Fetal Monitors
Fetal Monitors are used to monitor the heart of a baby during pregnancy, labour, and delivery.  It can also be used to check the duration of contractions. These Fetal Monitors will replace the current models, which are past their expected life cycle and need to be replaced.

Maternal
Dopplers on Stands
The Labour and Delivery Unit at RUH in Saskatoon is the Primary Obstetrical Care Unit and is also the northern referral center for patients and families requiring complex obstetrical care. Best practice for patients is to use dopplers with low risk pregnancies to listen to fetal heart rates from the time they present and throughout their labours. This allows patients to move more freely in their labour.

Maternal
4D Ultrasound Probe & Software
Saskatoon is the referral centre in Saskatchewan for comprehensive fetal heart ultrasounds (echocardiograms). A 4D echocardiogram is the standard in evaluation of baby where a heart anomaly is found or suspected. It allows the viewer to see the heart structure in 3D and how the heart contracts and functions, (the fourth dimension is movement over time). A 4D echocardiogram probe will help doctors make diagnoses that are more accurate for fetal patients and their families.

NICU
i-Stat Analyzer
On average, the PICU transport team makes around 500 trips a year, by both road and air. On route, it is necessary to assess the patient frequently, and administer treatment as needed. An i-STAT machine is an easy to use handheld blood analyzer. It measures the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, as well as determining the pH level or acidity. Using an i-STAT during transport accelerates the patient care decision-making process with a system that makes patient-side testing fast, easy, and accurate.

NICU
Crash Carts
When a code blue is alerted, medical teams rush to the patients’ bedside with an emergency/code blue crash cart. These urgent crises require immediate attention. As the seconds tick by, every minute and move matters, any potential delay could be fatal. These carts contain a defibrillator, monitor, IV and lab supplies, as well as instruments, and any medications needed in an emergency. Having these emergency crash carts results in better patient’s outcome and care.

NICU/PICU
AEEG Monitoring System
AEEG aids in the early detection of seizures in high-risk, premature infants – seizures that may be very difficult to clinically recognize. As untreated seizures can cause significant brain injury, early detection will lead to earlier management and improved outcomes.

NICU/PICU
InVos Monitor
The machine protects the brain and vital organs of children. Unique INVOS technology measures oxygen levels in the brain. It enables clinicians to detect subtle changes in blood flow to the brain in order to make timely, critical, life-saving decisions for improved patient outcomes.

Pediatric Head Injury
Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography
Over 20% of patients admitted to PICU have a new central nervous system injury or a neurologic complication of their critical illness. Being able to assess real-time cerebral blood flow in children with head injuries will provide two major benefits for our patients. First, it will directly influence care management in patients with acute brain injury. Second, it will provide innovative opportunities for research focusing on improving patient outcomes.

PICU
Procedure Cart
Procedure carts are stocked to accommodate specific procedures. They ensure that all equipment and supplies necessary are available at point of care to increase provider efficiency. This enhances patient safety, as all supplies are required without delay and infection control as the cart encloses the supplies.

Respiratory Therapy
Pulmovista 500
The Pulmovista 500 is a non-invasive way to produce a real-time, breath-by-breath look at the ventilation of the patient’s lungs without the use of radiation.  An electrode belt around the patient’s chest gives insight into their ventilation without causing any pain or discomfort to the child. Using the Pulmovista 500 will allow the Pediatric Department to become a leader in Canada when it comes to advanced ventilation and patient care in pediatrics.

Patient Care

PROVINCIAL

Pediatric Cardiology
CHAMPS Camp 2017
One in every 100 children born in Saskatchewan has a congenital heart defect. Children growing up with a heart defect are often restricted from playing sports and participating in certain exercises and activities. They are often of small stature and have difficulty growing normally. They also often suffer anxiety and mental health issues related to chronic health issues. For the last two years, CHAMPS CAMP summer camp has been developed by a group of dedicated physicians and researchers in partnership with our Foundation.  This summer camp provides a unique opportunity for children with a heart defect across Saskatchewan to learn what they really should and what they really can do.

REGINA & AREA

Physio Logic DigiPro Digital Thermometer
Used to make accurate assessments of childhood illnesses and infections based on information provided by the parent or caregiver.  Having an accurate temperature of a child during an illness provides the practitioner with valuable information and helps to guide decisions around antibiotic use and teaching in regards to good antibiotic stewardship.

SASKATOON & AREA

Normative Database for Pediatric Bone Density
Pediatric bone health may be compromised in a number of ways (genetic disorders, nutritional, medications, diseases) and treatment decisions are significantly impacted by the interpretation and trajectory of bone health status. The current standard of care for assessing bone health is with bone mineral density (BMD) assessments using Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA). This assessment is then compared with an age-specific, sex-specific normative database in order to provide a patient z-score.

MICYRN Partnership
The Maternal Infant Child and Youth Research Network (MICYRN) is a federal not-for-profit, charitable organization that builds capacity for high quality applied health research. It links 20 maternal and child health organizations based at academic health centres in Canada; is affiliated with more than 20 practice-based research networks; provides support to new and emerging teams; and has established strong national and international partnerships. MICYRN is unique in the world for this type of collaborative engagement. Working together in coordinated fashion enables the sharing of innovations and reduces duplication of effort and resource use, which means more funds, can be spent on doing research.

NICU
Premature Anne SimPad Plus Training Manikin
The Premature Anne is a realistically proportioned 25-week preterm infant simulation manikin. It is designed to facilitate training of healthcare professionals in the initiation of proper care and resuscitation techniques for preterm babies.  Premature Anne helps place learners in scenarios that simulate real-life experiences, which can be conducted to enhance and improve cross-functional team communication.

Air Canada Transport Program

REGINA & SASKATOON

Playroom Grants
Funds used to enhance pediatric playrooms in Saskatoon and Regina.

Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Capital Disbursements

Opening in late 2019, the new Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital will offer state-of-the-art equipment and facilities for children, mothers, and families from across our province. Centrally located on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon, our new children’s hospital will offer neonatal intensive care, pediatric intensive care, and general pediatrics, pediatric emergency and ambulatory services. Maternal services will include labour and delivery, antepartum, and postpartum. The 176-bed facility will provide the highest quality of care and put Saskatchewan at the forefront of research and innovation.

Research

“Research Chair” – $100,000 restricted allocated for the initiation of a Pediatric Research Chair.

“Improved Diagnosis of Pediatric Asthma:  Metabolomic Analysis of Urine” – Dr. Darryl Adamko, University of Saskatchewan

Asthma is the most frequent chronic disease of children and the number one reasons for pediatric emergency admissions in Canadian hospitals.  The lung tissues of children with asthma becomes inflamed and treatment often requires anti-inflammatory drugs like inhaled or oral corticosteroids.  Corticosteroids can have a number of unwanted side effects and deciding when to treat or increase the does is difficult for doctors to predict.  This renders control of the asthma less than optimal.  To measure inflammation, one could use a biopsy however; this is potentially dangerous and painful.  Other less invasive teste are available, but they are less accurate and not suited for the average doctor’s office.   Overall, there is an urgent need for a better test especially one that could be used within reach of a typical doctor’s office.  Developing a novel method to measure changes in children with asthma using a urine sample is instrumental.  The lung tissue damage from asthma creates unique markers in the body that can be measured in the urine.  It is believed that measuring these biomarkers in the urine will reflect changes in the disease.  It is suspect that the amount of these urine markers will decrease after the treatment of the diseases.  Ultimately, hope is that the urine test will not only diagnose asthma better than available techniques but will also help to better adjust the amount of medicine a child needs.

“Early Recognition of Neonatal HIE Through Urine Metabolomics and EEG Analysis” – Salah Almubarak, Department of Pediatrics

Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) can be devastating in newborns and has the potential to cause serious long-term disability. Hence, early recognition and introduction of appropriate treatment is crucial. Halting of HIE progression is important in preventing long-term complications. Early application of therapeutic hypothermia has become a standard of care especially within the first 6 hours of life; however, not all cases of neonates with HIE are recognized at an early stage despite intensive clinical monitoring. Often clinical evidence of HIE does not manifest in the first 24 hours of life when interventions are needed. As such, there are too many infants that go on to have severe brain injury (e.g. cerebral palsy). We need a better screening tool to guide earlier diagnosis and prevention of HIE progression. Metabolomics is the study of small molecules created by cell activity. In disease states, cells produce different chemical substances, which can be measured in a human body. Researchers aim to discover novel biological markers by using urine metabolomic analysis and comparing it to neonatal Electroencephalogram (EEG), in order to recognize HIE at early stage from birth and introduce therapeutic hypothermia to improve long-term neonatal outcome.

“The Chronic Pain Network” – Dr. Krista Baerg, Department of Pediatrics, University of Saskatchewan

Chronic pain is common and results in high healthcare utilization and lost productivity.  This network will establish provincial patient registries and national clinical trials collaborative.  The project will develop the infrastructure and momentum required to progress chronic pain research in Saskatchewan.  The opportunity to participate in clinical trials will enable patients to access new treatments while treating those patients appropriately and safety.  Many partnerships will exist nationally, provincially, within health regions and universities. This is a national collaborative spearheaded by internationally respected pain researchers.

“Indigenous Women’s Perspectives for Culturally Secure Birth Practices” – Angela Bowen, University of Saskatchewan

Indigenous women’s perspective for culturally secure birthing practices is a participatory research project that engages women in an Indigenous Women’s Birth Network to increase our understanding of culturally secure birth. The network will support women sharing their individual stories about their baby’s birth, participating in a talking circle, interpreting the study findings, and developing a photo/voice learning resource to increase the cultural competence and humility of care providers involved in maternity care. The project aims to enhance the maternal healthcare of Indigenous women that will in turn impact the health of the child and growing family.

“CHAMPS: Children’s Healthy-Heart and Activity Monitoring Program in Saskatchewan” – Tim Bradley, Department of Pediatrics

Congenital heart defects are one of the leading types of birth anomaly. Affected children can have abnormal arterial growth and development before and after birth producing increased stiffness of the arterial wall, a well-established risk factor for early onset of adult cardiovascular diseases like heart attacks and strokes. These children can also be of smaller stature, less physically active and at risk for mental health issues. Currently, no chronic disease management program addresses these health needs of the approximately 2400 affected children across Saskatchewan.

Building on previous work funded by Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation, more affected children are being recruited and their cardiovascular health, body composition, physical activity levels and psychological health will be monitored over the next 3 years. Baseline comprehensive assessments are performed in conjunction with an annual summer camp and compared to data from healthy age- and sex-matched children. Baseline testing includes basic heart, blood vessel and exercise measures to assess cardiovascular health; scans to assess body composition, bone and muscle health; interviews and accelerometry to assess physical activity levels; and questionnaires to assess psychological health. Annual re-testing will then be performed in conjunction with regular clinical follow-up visits. Our long-term goals are to identify which of these children will most benefit from exercise and lifestyle interventions as they transition into adulthood.

This project will be the first of its kind to provide comprehensive long-term monitoring of the physical and psychological health of these children. This new and innovative program tailored to each individual affected child’s health concerns, could then be used as a model to develop a Canada-wide chronic disease management program for children with congenital heart defects to optimize their growth, psychological and long-term cardiovascular health.

“Lactation Expression: Mothers’ Experiences, Information Needs, and Recommendations” – Marie Dietrich Leurer, University of Saskatchewan

Despite the well-known benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and infant, the majority of infants in Saskatchewan are not exclusively breastfed for six months as recommended by the World Health Organization. Women experience various challenges with breastfeeding, which may result in ending breastfeeding sooner than they desire. Breastmilk expression (e.g. pumping, hand expression) is an increasingly common practice among mothers to address challenges with breastfeeding and promote personal lifestyle choices. Little is known about the impact of expression on how long mothers breastfeed. In previous research studies, mothers identified a lack of knowledge related to the expression of breastmilk, and a need for more information and direction from health care providers (e.g. doctors, registered nurses). This research project will interview mothers in the Prince Albert area and Regina Qu’Appelle area to explore their thoughts about: (a) the impact of expression on the length of breastfeeding, (b) frequency, timing and method of expression, (c) mothers’ experiences with health care providers (e.g. helpful advice received and outstanding information gaps), and (d) recommendations for the health care system and other mothers. The findings will provide guidance to health care providers delivering breastfeeding education and support with the long-term goal of increasing the length of time that mothers’ breastfeed in Saskatchewan.

“Cannabidiol in Children with Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy: A Phase 1 Open Label Dose Escalation Study” – Richard J. Huntsman, University of Saskatchewan

Epileptic Encephalopathy Syndromes seizures are very difficult to control despite patients being placed on multiple medications.  Since treatments often cause significant side effects there is a need to find therapies that are effective and better tolerated for children.

There has been significant media interest regarding medical marijuana products for the treatment of seizures in children.  Hemp oil products with high cannabidiol and low tetrahydrocannabinol ratios have been reported to provide seizure relief and cognitive improvement in children who take them.  Parents have asked for these products to treat their children but due to lack of clinical information, physicians are often reluctant to prescribe.  Parents desperate to treat do so on own and may harm the child.  There is an urgent need to advance research on this treatment option.  This study is to assess the safety and tolerability of a Health Canada approved high CBD: low THC product in children with refractor Epileptic Encephalopathy.  Children enrolled will be monitored for quality of life and seizure frequency.

“PRE-GAIN Bone Health Pilot Study” – Munier Nour, Department of Pediatrics

Anorexia nervosa is a condition of severe low body weight. It often occurs in adolescence at a critical time for bone development. Adolescent females with anorexia nervosa are well known to be at risk for bone loss and bone fragility (osteoporosis). This is a result of a number of hormonal changes that occur in response to inadequate nutritional intake. Estrogen deficiency is thought to be a major contributor to the bone loss. Unfortunately, most studies that have attempted to replace estrogen in pill format in those with anorexia have not shown benefits to bone health. Recent developments to replace estrogen through topical application (transdermal) have shown promising results for bone health. Currently, no proven treatment or prevention therapy has been approved for optimizing bone health in young females with anorexia and new, effective strategies are desperately needed.

This study will assess bone health in 24 Saskatchewan adolescent females aged 12-20 years old with anorexia nervosa. Half will receive the topical estrogen. All participants will have their bone health assessed at the beginning of the study and at four other times over a 24-month period. Participants will fill out questionnaires and complete a bone density scan, spine x-rays, blood tests and new state of the art high resolution bone imaging techniques.

Through this study, we will gain a greater understanding of bone health in girls with anorexia. Additionally, this study may provide evidence for future therapies.

“Connected to Care: Uniting Patients, Families, and Practitioners Through a Plan of Care Portal for the Children’s Hospital of SK” – Tracie Risling, University of Saskatchewan

Hospital stays can be very overwhelming for both children and their family caregivers. Surroundings are unfamiliar; there are many members of the care team and a lot of information to try to remember. Research has shown that having access to information can help patients and caregivers feel more engaged in care, be more active in decision-making, and in general feel more satisfied with the hospital experience. Electronic patient portals are a new way to provide this essential information directly to patients or caregivers. These portals can be accessed on a tablet or other mobile device and can be very effective in influencing engagement and communication with the care team. Research has been done on patient portals with adult participants but the use of this technology for pediatric patients is very new.

This project will give families an opportunity to work in collaboration with the research team, healthcare practitioners, and software developers to create a new Plan of Care Portal (POCP) designed specifically for the Children’s Hospital of Saskatchewan. The research project is planned for three years, and will be done in three phases. Family caregivers and healthcare practitioners will contribute their ideas to the design of the POCP in the first phase of the project. Next, technology experts in the health region and project software developers will work to build and test the POCP. In the final phase, the research team will partner with nurses and family caregivers to evaluate the POCP over a six-month pilot period in the acute care setting. Select nurses will have tablet devices to offer the caregivers of patients under their care. If they choose to participate, the caregivers will use the portal and answer survey questions about the experience. Data logged during portal use will also help complete the evaluation.

“Intrauterine Inflammation as a Determinant of Pregnancy Outcome and Child Health” – Alan Rosenberg, Department of Pediatrics

The goal of this research is to improve understanding of the earliest origins of chronic diseases by studying how inflammation occurring during pregnancy can affect the occurrence of diseases in the child after birth.

Chronic diseases in Canada and in Saskatchewan are major burdens for affected patients, their families, and society. Prematurity; obesity and obesity-related diseases, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease; asthma; bone and joint diseases; and nervous system disorders represent major health burdens. There is strong evidence that inflammation occurring during pregnancy can contribute to diseases developing later in the offspring’s life. In this study, we will identify factors in pregnant women, including blood markers and genetic characteristics that appear when inflammation is present. Having a panel of tests to detect inflammation during pregnancy will allow us to then study how inflammation during pregnancy is associated with premature birth, impaired development of the nervous system, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, reduced bone quality, and respiratory conditions such as asthma.

With this research, our Saskatchewan team will be able to lead Canadian and international collaborations to investigate how genetics, lifestyle factors (such as nutrition, physical activity and reduced stress) and avoiding certain environmental exposures can help reduce inflammation during pregnancy to prevent disease and ensure healthy children now and into their long-term futures.

“Randomized Controlled Trial of the Internet-delivered Preoperative Preparation Program (I-PPP)” – Kristi Wright, University of Regina

Thousands of children have surgery every year, and for many children this is a stressful experience. For example children may cry, kick, or even screaming during this experience and these behaviours are related to negative outcomes such as prolonging induction of anesthesia as well as difficulties following surgery (e.g., separation anxiety, bed wetting). Surgical preparation programs prior to day of surgery are one approach employed to help children who are having an upcoming surgery and their families. However, well-designed, thorough programs have not been well integrated into hospital practice, which may be due to their high costs and low feasibility. Using the Internet as a way prepare children for an upcoming surgery may be an attractive option to address the existing concerns with traditionally delivered programs (i.e., expensive). Specifically, using the Internet as a method to prepare children for surgery would make the preparation widely accessible to parents and children would decrease having to visit the hospital prior to the day of surgery, is relatively inexpensive, and has little impact on the busy day surgery setting. To address this need, we designed an interactive, Internet-delivered preoperative preparation program for both child and parent. The present study proposes to evaluate this accessible approach for the preparation of children (3-10 years old) for surgery. Children will be randomly assigned to receive

treatment-as-usual, access to an Internet preparation program, or access to an Internet preparation program and also have a parent present during the anesthetic induction process. It is anticipated that children in the Internet preparation groups and their parents will have significantly less worries than the treatment as usual group during the day surgery experience, particularly during the most stressful time point (i.e., anesthetic induction). It is anticipated that our innovative approach to surgery preparation will aid in reducing both child and parent worries during the during the day surgery experience and overall improve our ability to provide the best care possible for children undergoing day surgery and their families at the Royal University Hospital

From August 1, 2015 to July 31, 2016 the Children’s Hospital Foundation of Saskatchewan distributed $2,177,587 for current maternal and pediatric needs in the 2016 fiscal year. In addition, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exception emerging researchers and research needs.

Education

RQHR

MEDEC – Metabolic & Diabetes Education Centre
“Diabetes in Children and Teens: A Survival Guide” DVDs and pamphlets are given to families of newly diagnosed children and teens with type 1 diabetes. These resources are also shared with teachers and schools who work with children with diabetes. The nurses find it a valuable resource to accompany their teaching and feel it is well received and appreciated by families and teachers. The booklet and DVD help parents with a newly diagnosed child and their child, if old enough, better understand type 1 diabetes. It helps illustrate how children can live well with the diagnosis and do well at school. Easy to follow, it provides a good introduction to families before providing more encompassing education and knowledge needed to self-manage diabetes. It also reinforces that good communication with a child’s school can help both parents and teachers provide a safe environment for the child.

SHR

Transport Team Training Conference
Annual Airborne Neonatal & Pediatric Transport Conference lectures on the innovative approaches and latest advances in transport from experts around the world.

Visiting Lectureship Program
This two-year commitment provides unique opportunities for child health practitioners, research scholars and educators to visit the Department of Pediatrics.  The program will invite nine visiting lectures each year and be thematically integrated and optimization for child health as a fundamental aim.

PICU
American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) Conference
Tissue plasma exchange is a new therapy offered through the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and is the only place to offer the treatment in Saskatchewan.  The Foundation disbursed funds for the Spectra Optia Apheresis Machine, which allows this program to function, and then further educate team leaders and users.

CAPHC Membership
The Canadian Association of Pediatric Health Centres (CAPHC) is a recognized leader and advocate for advancing the improvement of healthcare for Canada’s children and youth.

Maternal
Family Centered Maternity Care Conference with Celeste Phillips
A four-day conference with a comprehensive education session for the entire Maternal Department.  Funding went towards bringing in educator Celeste Phillips, who presented a model of care and helped develop a clear action plan to educate and engage staff on how they can play a role in the transformation.

University of Saskatchewan
Pediatric UpToDate Subscription Renewal
UpToDate is a trusted source for evidence-based clinical information for clinicians across the world. UpToDate features recommendations that are reviewed, fact-checked, and graded by a global peer-review network. With the enhancement of team communication and team spaces, the information library will have the best in medical references available at their fingertips.  The annual subscriptions are available to approximately 30 physicians.

Community
The Loft Program
Families in need receive food and gift hampers to help throughout the holiday season.

Equipment

SHR

NICU
Cerebral Oximeter
Cerebral oximeters provide clinicians with a non-invasive “window” into the body to measure blood oxygenation in the microvasculature, allowing surgical teams to detect and correct problems that can lead to further complications.

NICU
Cuddle Cots
Thanks to Cuddle Cots, grieving parents in Saskatchewan who have suffered the loss of a baby will have a little more time to say goodbye. Cuddle Cots are medical equipment that act like a refrigerated bassinet and allow babies to stay with their parents in the room after they have passed.

PEDS
Intellivue Monitors
Patient monitoring spans care environments, patient acuity levels, and clinical requirements.

Maternal
Anesthesia Portable Ultrasound
Pregnant women are sometimes subject to multiple painful needle punctures when attempts are made to establish intravenous.  Anesthesia Portable Ultrasound machines overcome those challenges by visualizing the veins that are trying to be accessed.

Northern Medical Services
Hospira Plum A+ Intravenous Pumps & Tubing (4)
These IV Pumps greatly enhance the care provided to Saskatchewan’s large pediatric population with fluid resuscitation/maintenance fluids as well as IV medication administration.  The IV Pumps were needed for the communities of Pelican Narrows, Deschambault Lake & Southend, offering primary care services including emergency treatment.

Northern Medical Services
Chemistry & Hematology Analyzer
Easy and fully automated which accurately produces results of the testing requirements for chemistry and hematology.  Works in conjunction with the InTouch Express.

North Medical Services
In Touch Express (2)
Saskatchewan has a large percentage of pediatric patients living in rural/remote communities.  Access therefore becomes a major issue for our acute/critically ill children.  The Intouch Express is used as a mobile remote device to optimize pediatric inter-facility transportation.  Improving access through a remote presence device enables the local team to perform diagnostic tests utilizing efficient and compact equipment. This tool is a transformative solution for addressing a deep and ongoing gap in health care access in communities across Saskatchewan.

Maternal

Lactate meter and strips

Brings lactate testing directly to patient’s bedside to test blood.

PEDS
Therapeutic Pediatric Equipment
Enables participation in activities of daily living to promote and enable independence.  The biggest struggle is providing treatment to these types of referrals due to the severe lack of equipment available for rehabilitation.

Maternal
Fetal Monitors
Used during labour to monitor fetal heartbeat and maternal uterine contractions.  Current monitors do not allow the transducers to be in water, while these newer models do.  With these new monitors, women in labor who require monitoring can be in the shower or tub, which many women find helpful.

PICU
WOW Cart
A workstation on wheels (WOW) allows clinicians the mobility and flexibility they need while charting. Currently, manual collection of and organizing patient data causes unnecessary delays and errors.  WOW Carts allow nurse and clinicians to have real-time access to patient info in a convenient mobile platform.

Pediatric Outpatients
Smart Monitor – Pediatric Sleep Disorder
To diagnose obstructive sleep apnea and have breathing assessed by machines that monitor oxygen saturation, airflow at the nose, chest and abdomen motion, heart rate and movement.  The new units will be used in Saskatoon while older monitors will expand programming in Prince Albert.

PEDS
Sleep Chairs (3)
New sleep chairs required in patient rooms for spouse to stay with family.

NICU
Neofeed Enteral Syringe Pump
The NeoFeed neonatal enteral syringe pump helps healthcare workers avoid the danger of IV misconnections in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.  The NeoFeed pump functions with specialty syringes designed specifically for pediatric enteral feeding.

Patient Care

ABI Outreach
ABI Youth Camp Grant
A camp for children who have sustained a moderate to severe acquired brain injury.  The purpose is to provide education on ABI to the youth and to teach them how to overcome challenges to live successfully.

Air Canada Transport Program

Designated Funds Enhancements
NICU/PICU/PEDS and Child Life designated funds enhancements are used to fund items such as glide rockers, toys, books, computer equipment, and more.

Comfort Kits
Gift bags from the Inspired Giving Program at the Children’s Hospital Jeans & Jewels Gala are provided to children in Saskatoon, Regina and Prince Albert pediatric departments, offering comfort and positive distraction while young patients are staying in the hospital.

Teammates for Kids
Child Life Zone
Funds raised at the Forever for the Kids events in Saskatoon and Regina were disbursed to Garth Brook’s Teammates for Kids Foundation to design and build a Child Life Zone in Children’s Hospital of Saskatchewan. The Child Life Zone, a first in Canada, will be a state-of-the-art therapeutic play area for pediatric patients and their parents. The Teammates for Kids Foundation and Garth Brooks covered the overhead costs of both events, ensuring that 100% of the money raised went directly to the Child Life Zone.

PICU
Junior SIM Doll
The benefits and new standards in education require the department to train in a simulation environment.  This includes the SIMNewB Simulator Manikin and SimPad System with clinical accessory kit.

RQHR & SHR
Playroom Grants
Funds used to enhance the pediatric playroom in Saskatoon and Regina.

Research

“Research Chair” – $100,000 restricted allocated for the initiation of a Pediatric Research Chair.

Dr. Huntsman, Assoc. Professor & Division Head, Pediatric Neurology
“Cannabidiol in Children with Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy:  A Phase 1 Open Label Dose Escalation Study”

Epileptic Encephalopathy Syndromes seizures are very difficult to control despite patients being placed on multiple medications.  Since treatments often cause significant side effects there is a need to find therapies that are effective and better tolerated for children.

There has been significant media interest regarding medical marijuana products for the treatment of seizures in children.  Hemp oil products with high cannabidiol (CBD) and low tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) ratios have been reported to provide seizure relief and cognitive improvement in children who take them.  Parents have asked for these products to treat their children but due to lack of clinical information, physicians are often reluctant to prescribe.  There is an urgent need to advance research on this treatment option.  This study is to assess the safety and tolerability of a Health Canada approved high CBD: low THC product in children with refractor Epileptic Encephalopathy.  Children enrolled will be monitored for quality of life and seizure frequency.

Dr. Alan Rosenberg – Head, Division of Pediatrics, Research & Division of Pediatric Rheumatology – University of Saskatchewan
“The Biologic Basis of Co-existent Uveitis and Arthritis in Children: Towards Early Detection, Targeted Treatment and Prevention”

Arthritis is among the most common chronic disabling diseases of childhood affecting an estimated 1 in 1000 Canadian children.  60% of children with arthritis will continue to have arthritis as adults.  In addition to inflammation of their joints children can also experience uveitis, a form of eye inflammation, which can result in serious deterioration of eyesight potentially leading to permanent vision loss.  The reasons why are unknown and it is challenging for the doctor to accurately predict the onset of uveitis.

This study will explore the connection between uveitis and arthritis.  Investigation of the structure of collagen, an important protein found in the joint and the eye which is altered by certain other proteins in a way that promotes inflammation at these sites.  Using the information discovered in animals, testing on children will occur to predict outcomes.

Determining the mechanisms that explain the associations, more specific treatments and insight into possible causes of the condition will be found.

Determining the mechanisms that explain the associations, more specific treatments and insight into possible causes of the condition will be found.

Dr. Hassan Vatanparast & Dr. Alan Rosenberg – Head, Division of Pediatrics & College of Pharmacy/Nutrition – University of Saskatchewan
“The Impact of Vitamin D on Disease Activity in Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis”

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA; idiopathic means the cause is unknown) is one of the most common chronic diseases, and an important cause of disability in Canadian children.  In Saskatchewan it is estimated that 1 in 1000 children have JIA.  Causes are not understood but likely include both genetic and environmental influences.  One factor that may play a role in influencing the occurrence and outcomes of JIA is vitamin D.

Vitamin D is reported to play a role in the reduction of disease activity in autoimmune diseases including JIA by suppressing inflammation which consequently reduces the symptoms and signs.  80% of children with JIA have low levels of vitamin D.  No Canadian study has investigated the relationship between the two.  The aim is to understand the association between the two.  Patients with the onset of JIA from multiple centres were enrolled in the Biologically Based Outcome Predictors in JIA cohort study.  Existing data will be used to explore the association between vitamin D status and measures of disease activity and explore a potential genetic variability in vitamin D receptors in JIA patients.

This study will be the first to investigate both the genetic and environmental role that vitamin D plays in controlling JIA.  Through this study, there is hope to have data for specific guidelines for vitamin D in management of JIA patients.

Dr. Darryl Adamko – College of Medicine – University of Saskatchewan
“Improved Diagnosis of Pediatric Asthma:  Metabolomic Analysis of Urine”

Asthma is the most frequent chronic disease of children and the number one reason for pediatric emergency admissions in Canadian hospitals.  The lung tissues of children with asthma become inflamed and treatment often requires anti-inflammatory drugs like inhaled or oral corticosteroids.  Corticosteroids can have a number of unwanted side-effects and deciding when to treat or increase the dose is difficult for doctors to predict.  This renders control of the asthma less than optimal.  To measure inflammation, one could use a biopsy however this is potentially dangerous and painful.  Other less invasive teste are available, but they are less accurate and not suited for the average doctor’s office.   Overall there is an urgent need for a better test.  Developing a novel method to measure changes in children with asthma using a urine sample is instrumental.  The lung tissue damage from asthma creates unique markers in the body that can be measured in the urine.  It is believed that measuring these biomarkers in the urine will reflect changes in the disease.  It is suspect that the amount of these urine markers will decrease after the treatment of the diseases.  Ultimately, hope is that the urine test will not only diagnose asthma better than available techniques but will also help to better adjust the amount of medicine a child needs.

Dr Krista Baerg – Department of Pediatrics – University of Saskatchewan
“The Chronic Pain Network”

Chronic pain is common and results in high health utilization and lost productivity.  The network will establish provincial patient registries and a national clinical trials collaborative.  The project will develop the infrastructure and momentum required to progress chronic pain research in Saskatchewan.  The opportunity to participate in clinical trials will enable patients to access new treatments while treating those patient appropriately and safety.  Many partnerships will exist nationally, provincially, within health regions and universities. This is a national collaborative spearheaded by internationally respected pain researchers.
Marta Erlandson, PhD, Assistant Professor – College of Kinesiology. “A Pilot Health Intervention Study for Children with Congenital Heart Defects:  CHAMPS – Children’s Healthy Heart Camp in Saskatchewan”

Congenital Heart defects (CHD) are a leading type of birth defect effecting approximately 2000 Saskatchewan kids.  Survival rates of these children have steadily increased with upwards of 85% now living into adulthood.  These children are less physically active than healthy peers and at a greater risk of mental health issues.  Very little is known and there is no comprehensive chronic disease management (CDM) program to address their health needs.  This research will explore the physical and mental health of children with CHD and pilot a supervised CDM program.  30 Saskatchewan children aged 7-13 will participate in a 1 week CHAMPS camp that promotes activity, healthy habits and psychological well- being.  Body composition, cardiovascular and psychological, and health anxiety will be measured.  These then will be compared to 30 healthy children.  The project will be the first of its kind to focus on specific aspects of physical and psychological health of children with CHD and to pilot new, innovative programming tailored to their health concerns.  This project is a vital first step in the development of a national CDM program to optimize growth, physical development, and mental health of children with CHD while minimizing future chronic disease risk factors.

From August 1, 2014 to July 31, 2015 Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation distributed $1,058,268 for current pediatric needs in the 2015 fiscal year. In addition, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exception emerging researchers and research needs.

Education

RQHR

Regional Diabetes Conference Sponsorship
Diabetes prevention and management in the RQHR is planned, delivered and evaluated within the context of the Prevention and Management Model for Chronic Disease (Expanded Chronic Care Model) and is informed by the Provincial Diabetes Plan and the RQHR vision, mission and strategic themes. The RQHR brings together a broad-based community support network to address the determinants of health. There is robust multi-sectoral collaboration and cooperation around health promotion, diabetes prevention, and diabetes management strategies. Programs are informed and driven with input from a grass roots level.

SHR

Nephrology Team          
Dialysis Conference 
This conference specializes in pediatric dialysis and chronic kidney disease management.  This conference convenes an international group of practitioners and researchers to discuss current development in the field of dialysis.

Transport Team Training 
To establish provincial team training to promote and facilitate child health related care while traveling throughout the province.  The program is to provide opportunities for mentoring that generate high quality, relevant research results.  The training undertaken has a prompt and direct impact on improving transport care.

Evidence Live Conference   
The purpose is to ensure that practitioners recognize and apply the current best evidence to each person, factoring in that person’s unique medical situations.  It has become integral in the delivery of child health and the teaching of EBM is mandated for under and post graduates and had been adopted by all healthcare disciples.

Pediatric Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Conference
A highly specialized treatment conference for children, who are septic, overdosed, metabolically challenged and severely fluid overloaded.  These patients receive ventilator support, hemodynamic monitoring, cardiac support meds, and ant-infective therapies with parenteral nutrition regimes.  This care is extremely complex.  This conference focuses on providing knowledge and education to improve the outcomes for those children who develop or at risk of renal injury and failure.

Society for Adolescent Health & Medicine Conference 
Transferring care from the adolescence to the adult system usually happens at age 18 while they are trying to cope with a multitude of developmental tasks.  Pediatric and adult care settings are very different and more responsibility is shifted to the adolescent in adult care models.  The need for a transition clinic and process has been increasingly apparent.  The conference focuses on transitions and promoting health through adolescence and young adulthood.  The outcome to educate peers and families through the process of transitioning, empowering them to feel ready to leave the care providers they have known and confident in their ability to navigate the system that will continue to provide them care through the rest of their life.

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN

PEDS Outpatients
Visual enhancement of pediatric outpatients’ window file with healthy imagery.

COMMUNITY

The Loft Program  
Families in need receive food and gift hampers to help throughout the holiday season.

Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) Manuals
Manuals for Pediatric Transport Education.

Equipment

SHR

NICU    
Breast Pumps (2)  
Symphony is the only evidence based breast pump helping mothers achieve more milk faster.  It is the first electric hospital grade breast pump to mimic a baby’s two rhythm nursing pattern by using technology that pumps in an initial rapid stimulation phase, then a slower expression phase.

NICU    
Milk Warmers (5)  
Eliminates contamination risk associated with warming feedings in water.  Consistently warms milk to temperatures similar to expressed human milk and safely thaws milk in less than 30 minutes to refrigerated temperature for storage up to 24 hours.

Pediatrics           
Point of Care Ultrasounds (2)   
Pediatric point of care ultrasound is necessary for direct visualization of large and small veins in order to minimize complications from multiple attempts and maximize efficiency in obtaining venous access in a child undergoing an uncomfortable procedure.  The ultrasound is also used for early diagnosis of life threatening events such as pneumothorax and pericardial tamponade.  It provides information that can trigger lifesaving measures.

NICU    
Infant Evacuation System (2)
Trialed by NICU, it is the only product for emergency evacuation that is safe for newborns and infants.  It provides one nurse with the capability of evacuating six babies allowing them to glide down a flight of stairs with no bouncing.

NICU & Post-Partum     
Transcutaneous Jaundice Meters (12)  
The JM105 is the most technologically advanced model useful for premature babies as small as 26 weeks.  The accuracy tested meters with custom calibrated nomograms are cornerstone to the recently implemented neonatal hyperbilirubinemia screening programs at the Department of Pediatrics.  The non-invasive meter measures the yellowness of the tissue via a flash of light when pressed gently to the baby’s sternum.  It also reduces blood serum testing on babies.  The meters will make the sustainability of the newborn jaundice screening program more viable, effective and comprehensive.   (An addition was ordered and designated to the Pelican Narrows location.)

Respiratory Therapy      
Philips IntelliVue TcG210 Transcutaneous Monitor     
Respiratory Therapy is responsible for supporting the ventilation of acutely ill children from across the province.  In order to assess the effectiveness of ventilation and response to therapy a patient’s oxygen and carbon dioxide levels must be assessed, this is typically done through a blood test.  With the use of a transcutaneous sensor and monitor patients can be assessed non-invasively allowing children in hospital to receive fewer pokes.

Pediatric Outpatients   
Vital Signs Monitor        
The purpose of the vital signs monitor is to quickly obtain accurate vital sign measurements during a child’s clinic visit in the Pediatric Outpatient Department.  Patients who primarily benefit from this piece of equipment are children with suspected or confirmed congenital and acquired heart defects.  Accurate and quick measurement of blood pressure and oxygen saturation are key to making timely treatment decisions.

Pediatric Hematology  
INR Point of Care Machines   
Children & adolescents on oral anticoagulation therapy present special challenges in terms of rapid fluctuations in the monitoring of their International Normalised Radio (INR) values, interruption of daily life due to frequent hospital visits as well as difficulties and pain in the performance of venepuncture.  Patient self-testing with INR Point of Care machines is being recognized as improving the quality of care for selected pediatric patients on anticoagulation.  The program requires ten INR Point of Care machines to be used in outpatient by those who will benefit most from being a part of the INR Point of Care program due to their locations, treatment and fluctuation of anticoagulation management.

Pediatrics           
Pheresis Machine 
Plasmapheresis is technology that can remove components from the blood.  This can range from toxins in metabolic diseases, WBC’s in cancer patients, immune mediators in kidney disease and inflammatory mediators in children with infection.  Without the machine, this lifesaving service is unavailable to pediatric patients in Saskatchewan.

Maternal            
Fetal Echo Monito   
A fetal echocardiogram is an ultrasound performed of the baby’s heart before the baby is born.  The Fetal Echo Monitor will allow pregnant women and physician to view the scan of the fetus allowing the physician to explain as they go.

PICU     
Crash Carts (2)  
The crash cart is the trolley for storing lifesaving equipment and drugs for PICU.

Maternal            
Fetal Monitors (2)   
Used during labour to monitor fetal heartbeat and maternal uterine contractions.  The current monitors do not allow the transducers to be in water, newer models allow for this.  With these new monitors women in labor who require monitoring can be in the shower or tub which many women find helpful.

Patient Care

SHR

Pediatric Transport Team Outerwear
The Transport Team provides pediatric tertiary care to all rural and tertiary care locations in Saskatchewan.  This team utilizes both road and air ambulance service.  Always in uniform, the winter jackets and pants are needed to perform daily transport services in harsh climate conditions.

NICU    
SIM Doll
New standards in education require the Department of Pediatrics to train in a simulation environment.  This includes the SimNewB Simulator Manikin and SimPad System with clinical accessory kit.  With realistic newborn trains and lifelike clinical feedback, SimNewB is ideal for training for the specific needs of neonates and allows learners to practice a large range of neonatal skills within a realistic simulation environment.

Designated Funds Enhancements 
NICU/PICU/PEDS and Child Life designated funds enhancements are used to fund items such as glide rockers, toys, books, computer equipment and more.

Air Canada Transport Program  

RQHR & SHR

Playroom Grants  
Funds used to enhance the playrooms in Saskatoon and Regina

Research

Dr. Huntsman, Assoc. Professor & Division Head, Pediatric Neurology 
“Cannabidiol in Children with Refractory Epileptic Encephalopathy:  A Phase 1 Open Label Dose Escalation Study”

Epileptic Encephalopathy Syndromes seizures are very difficult to control despite patients being placed on multiple medications.  Since treatments often cause significant side effects there is a need to find therapies that are effective and better tolerated for children.

There has been significant media interest regarding medical marijuana products for the treatment of seizures in children.  Hemp oil products with high cannabidiol (CBD) and low tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) ratios have been reported to provide seizure relief and cognitive improvement in children who take them.  Parents have asked for these products to treat their children but due to lack of clinical information, physicians are often reluctant to prescribe.  There is an urgent need to advance research on this treatment option.  This study is to assess the safety and tolerability of a Health Canada approved high CBD: low THC product in children with refractor Epileptic Encephalopathy.  Children enrolled will be monitored for quality of life and seizure frequency.

Marta Erlandson, PhD, Assistant Professor –  College of Kinesiology – University of Saskatchewan         
“A Pilot Health Intervention Study for Children with Congenital Heart Defects:  CHAMPS – Children’s Healthy Heart Camp in Saskatchewan”

Congenital Heart defects (CHD) are a leading type of birth defect effecting approximately 2000 Saskatchewan kids.  Survival rates of these children have steadily increased with upwards of 85% now living into adulthood.  These children are less physically active than healthy peers and at a greater risk of mental health issues.  Very little is known and there is no comprehensive chronic disease management (CDM) program to address their health needs.  This research will explore the physical and mental health of children with CHD and pilot a supervised CDM program.  30 Saskatchewan children aged 7-13 will participate in a 1 week CHAMPS camp that promotes activity, healthy habits and psychological well- being.  Body composition, cardiovascular and psychological, and health anxiety will be measured.  These then will be compared to 30 healthy children.  The project will be the first of its kind to focus on specific aspects of physical and psychological health of children with CHD and to pilot new, innovative programming tailored to their health concerns.  This project is a vital first step in the development of a national CDM program to optimize growth, physical development, and mental health of children with CHD while minimizing future chronic disease risk factors.

Dr. Krista Baerg, Department of Pediatrics          
“Accuracy & Precision Testing of JM-105 Transcutaneous Jaundice Meter”

Newborn jaundice affects approximately 60% of infants with 2% requiring treatment.  Jaundice screening takes place within 72 hours of birth to determine if treatment or additional follow up is required.  Transcutaneous technology allows for non-invasive testing at the bedside with immediate results as well as reduced need for painful blood draws, reduced time waiting for specimen transportation and processing and challenges related to contacting the family in community for follow up.  Accuracy and precision testing of 16 new JM-105 meters must be undertaken before they can be integrated into existing protocols.

Dr. Alan Rosenberg, Department of Pediatrics  
“The Biologic Basis of Co-existent Uveitis and Arthritis in Children: Towards Early Detection, Targeted Treatment and Prevention”

Arthritis is among the most common chronic disabling diseases of childhood affecting an estimated 1 in 1000 Canadian children.  60% of children with arthritis will continue to have arthritis as adults.  In addition to inflammation of their joints children can also experience uveitis, a form of eye inflammation, which can result in serious deterioration of eyesight potentially leading to permanent vision loss.  The reasons why are unknown and it is challenging for the doctor to accurately predict the onset of uveitis.

This study will explore the connection between uveitis and arthritis.  Investigation of the structure of collagen, an important protein found in the joint and the eye which is altered by certain other proteins in a way that promotes inflammation at these sites.  Using the information discovered in animals, testing on children will occur to predict outcomes.

Determining the mechanisms that explain the associations, more specific treatments and insight into possible causes of the condition will be found.

Dr. Hassan Vatanparast & Dr. Alan Rosenberg – Head, Division of Pediatrics & College of Pharmacy/Nutrition – University of Saskatchewan.           
“The Impact of Vitamin D on Disease Activity in Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis”

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JLA; idiopathic means the cause is unknown) is one of the most common chronic diseases, and an important cause of disability in Canadian children.  In Saskatchewan it is estimated that 1 in 1000 children have JIA.  Causes are not understood but likely include both genetic and environmental influences.  One factor that may play a role in influencing the occurrence and outcomes of JIA is vitamin D.

Vitamin D is reported to play a role in the reduction of disease activity in autoimmune diseases including JIA by suppressing inflammation which consequently reduces the symptoms and signs.  80% of children with JIA have low levels of vitamin D.  No Canadian study has investigated the relationship between the two.  The aim is to understand the association between the two.  Patients with the onset of JIA from multiple centres were enrolled in the Biologically Based Outcome Predictors in JIA cohort study.  Existing data will be used to explore the association between vitamin D status and measures of disease activity and explore a potential genetic variability in vitamin D receptors in JIA patients.

This study will be the first to investigate both the genetic and environmental role that vitamin D plays in controlling JIA.  Through this study, there is hope to have data for specific guidelines for vitamin D in management of JIA patients.

Dr. Darryl Adamko, College of Medicine – University of Saskatchewan
“Improved Diagnosis of Pediatric Asthma:  Metabolomic Analysis of Urine”

Asthma is the most frequent chronic disease of children and the number one reason for pediatric emergency admissions in Canadian hospitals.  The lung tissues of children with asthma become inflamed and treatment often requires anti-inflammatory drugs like inhaled or oral corticosteroids.  Corticosteroids can have a number of unwanted side-effects and deciding when to treat or increase the dose is difficult for doctors to predict.  This renders control of the asthma less than optimal.  To measure inflammation, one could use a biopsy however this is potentially dangerous and painful.  Other less invasive teste are available, but they are less accurate and not suited for the average doctor’s office.   Overall there is an urgent need for a better test.  Developing a novel method to measure changes in children with asthma using a urine sample is instrumental.  The lung tissue damage from asthma creates unique markers in the body that can be measured in the urine.  It is believed that measuring these biomarkers in the urine will reflect changes in the disease.  It is suspect that the amount of these urine markers will decrease after the treatment of the diseases.  Ultimately, hope is that the urine test will not only diagnose asthma better than available techniques but will also help to better adjust the amount of medicine a child needs.

From August 1, 2013 to July 31, 2014 Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation distributed $913,343 for current pediatric needs in the 2014 fiscal year. In addition, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exception emerging researchers and research needs.

Education

RQHR

Child Life Conference  
Annual conference which allows Child Life Therapists to learn improved medical procedures and encourage normal development and the emotional well-being for children in the healthcare setting.  It is a great networking opportunity with other professionals from Canada and the US.  The conference was attended by the Child Life Rec Therapists in Regina.

MEDEC – Metabolic & Diabetes Education Centre   
“Diabetes in Children and Teens: A Survival Guide” DVDs and pamphlets are given to the families of newly diagnosed children/teens with type 1 diabetes. These resources are also shared with teachers/schools who work with children with diabetes. Each DVD and pamphlet given out proudly displays a Children’s Hospital Foundation of Saskatchewan logo.  The booklet and DVD help parents with a newly diagnosed child and their child, if old enough, to understand what type 1 diabetes is. It helps illustrate how children can live well with the diagnosis and do well at school. It makes it easy to follow and is a good introduction to the family before education is provided for all the skills and knowledge they need to self-manage their diabetes. It also reinforces that good communication with the school can help both parents and teachers provide safe environment for the child.

SHR

Pediatric Nursing:  Care of the Hospitalized Child 
The conference strengthens nursing assessment skills, provide evidence based patient care, communicate effectively, and learn about various topics in pediatrics from babies to adolescents.  The conference is comprised of various educational speakers that address issues related to this line of work.

Pediatric Trainee Research Fund  
This final payment is to establish a pediatric trainee research fund to promote and facilitate child health related research by trainees at the University of Saskatchewan allowing their skills and knowledge to continue and to participate in research during their future careers.  The program is to provide opportunities for mentoring that generate high quality, relevant research results.  The research undertaken has prompt and direct impact on improving health.  Trainees play integral roles in advancing these and other research agendas.

Health Care Provider Information Library    
With the enhancement of team communication and team spaces the information library will have the best in medical references available at their fingertips.  The annual subscriptions are available to approximately 30 physicians.

CAPWHN Conference  
The three day conference includes topics on breastfeeding, community health, perinatal mental health neonatal, perinatal care education for nursing and women’s health by expanding their understanding and exploring how culture affects women and their families.  This conference focuses to maternal and newborn care as well as health and home.  The attendee was also a presenter on the topic of “accuracy and Prevision Testing of Transcutaneous Bilirubin Meters.

Pediatric Website Re-Design 
The Pediatric Department was looking for fresh stories and pictures to use to promote the department on the website.  A freelance writer along with a professional photographer was used to provide information for not only the website but material for provincial events as well.

COMMUNITY

The Loft Program 
Families in need receive food and gift hampers to help throughout the holiday season.

Equipment

SHR

PEDS (Respiratory Services)       
SiPAP Infant Non-Evasive Ventilation Devices (2)   
Non-invasive ventilation refers to providing mechanical ventilation using a mask instead of an endotracheal tube.  Non-invasive ventilation has become a therapy to assist in the management of chronic lung disease by supporting an infant’s respiratory efforts until they can manage on their own.  Need for SiPAP devices have continued to increase as there are not enough to meet patient demand.  Patients in NICU or PICU may be given an alternative, less optimal therapy when the devices are in use elsewhere.  The addition of two devices assisted in meeting the needs for therapy minimizing the need for mechanical ventilation and the risks associated with it.

PEDS (Respiratory Services)       
BiPAP Infant Non-Evasive Ventilation Devices (4) 
Non-invasive ventilation refers to providing mechanical ventilation using a mask instead of an endotracheal tube.  Non-invasive ventilation allows the patient to communicate and eat under relatively normal conditions which is important for patient self-sufficiency.  The need for BiPAP devices has continued to increase as there are not enough to meet patient demand.  The therapy assists in the management of chronic condition including obstructive sleep apnea and neuromuscular disorders.  As there is no currently pediatric sleep lab, some patients can be assessed with overnight oximetry but those that require a sleep lab and assessment of non-invasive ventilation therapy are required to go out of province.  With the new devices, this therapy will be used more to treat chronic conditions for both in/out patients.  The addition of four devices assisted in meeting the needs for therapy minimizing the need for mechanical ventilation and the risks associated with it.

PICU (Respiratory Services)       
EMMA Capnograph (3) 
Capnography is the monitoring of exhaled carbon dioxide concentration, however the EMMA Capnograph can also confirm proper placement of endotracheal tubes, enable clinicians to assess the depth and effectiveness of compressions, helps clinicians assess the effectiveness of CPR and guide ventilation and allows quick recognition of a patent’s return of spontaneous circulation during cardiac arrest.   This small, portable device will be used on the resuscitation carts within PICU.  This device is superior to others because of its quick start up time, instant breath by breath reading of carbon dioxide, minimal breath volume dead space and batteries that are easily changeable.

PICU     
LifePak Monitors (2)     
The Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) provides inter-facility transport of critically ill and injured children.  The PICU team facilitates 300 trips per year.  The monitors are necessary in rapid provision of advanced pediatric critical care to the seriously ill patients and are crucial in management and continuance of intensive care throughout transport.  With this item, the team can continue to support the safe and efficient transport of the children of Saskatchewan

PEDS Nephrology           
Handheld Doppler – Infant BP Measurement   
The technology currently being used to measure blood pressures are designed for use in adults. Due to how high the machine inflation pressure goes and how aggressive it seeks to find pressure, the slightest movement will throw off the measurement.  The handheld Doppler ultrasound is an attractive alternative for quick accurate assessment of systolic blood pressure when used in combination with a manual blood pressure cuff.  The rhythmic heartbeat sound has a soothing effect on infants and helps them to become calm while the blood pressure is measured to get a more accurate reading

NICU/PICU        
Laryngoscope
Emergency or difficult airway management requires advanced equipment and access to video laryngoscopes.  The Laryngoscope is a necessity for all emergency airway carts.

NICU/PICU        
Capnograph/Pulse CO2 Monitor    
A non-invasive portable monitor for early detection of evolving respiratory failure and monitoring during procedural sedation.  Refines and improves objective data for recognition of respiratory failure as well as a clear picture of the patient’s respiratory status.

NICU/PICU        
INVOS Oximeter Monitoring System 
Monitoring cerebral oxygenation following traumatic brain injury, during septic shock or in patients with low cardiac output syndrome has become standard of care in more centers and allows provision of advanced refined neuro-protective care.  The INVOS Oximeter Monitoring System gives you a non-invasive “window” that allows for the ability to follow the perfusion of other organ systems including the renal and splanchnic flow. Real-time monitoring of site specific blood oxygen saturation in the brain and other body tissues helps surgical and intensive care teams detect and correct ischemic problems that can lead to complications.

PICU     
Smart Pump Technology Syringe Pumps (6)  
Syringe pumps are used to deliver small doses of medication in acute care settings. These syringe pumps, resembling an insulin pump, are used in the medication delivery to patients in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU).

Acute Care PEDS
Digital Baby Scale   
The scale has the ability to weigh infants with precision to .01 pound resolution.  This precision is extremely important when monitoring growth to the precise degree. This scale is specifically beneficial for infants who may fail to thrive or are medically compromised.

Acute Care PEDS             
Stand Up Digital Weigh Scale for Children and Adolescents (4)
The scale has the ability to weigh children and adolescents with precision to .01 pound resolution being specifically beneficial to oncology patients where precise weight is required for medication quantities.

Acute Care PEDS             
Bladder Scanner
The bladder scanner is a 3D ultrasound instrument that provides quick, accurate, reliable, and non-invasive bladder volume measurement.

NICU    
CO2 Monitor
Monitors the respiratory status of critically ill infants by measuring oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in the blood through the infant’s skin – without having to draw blood.  This allows for a quicker response to changes in oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in very ill infants that are usually on mechanical ventilators.

NICU    
Biliblanket
A Biliblanket is a portable medical device for an infant that treats jaundice. The Biliblanket exerts a blue/white light that helps break down high levels of bilirubin in the infant’s bloodstream.  The new system delivers therapy, decreases stress and allows for improved exposure to the light along with faster recovery time.

Labour & Delivery          
Birthing Bed   
This bed is designed to provide comfortable and effective support for the mother, and functionality for nursing staff through all stages of the birthing process.

NICU    
EMMA Capnograph & Neopuff (2)     
Capnography is the monitoring of exhaled carbon dioxide concentration, however the EMMA Capnograph can also confirm proper placement of endotracheal tubes, enable clinicians to assess the depth and effectiveness of compressions, helps clinicians assess the effectiveness of CPR and guide ventilation and allow for quick recognition of a patent’s return of spontaneous circulation during cardiac arrest.  The Neopuff allows bagging of infants under 10kg while achieving controlled target Peak Inspiratory Pressure while delivering consistent pressure to the lungs.  It is a small portable device for the resuscitation carts within PICU.  This device is superior to others because of its quick start up time, instant breath by breath reading of carbon dioxide, minimal breath volume dead space and batteries that are easily changeable.

NICU Respiratory Therapy          
High Frequency Jet Ventilators (2)  
This highly specialized ventilator is designed to provide ventilation therapy to only pediatric patients, specifically the most vulnerable and complicated infants in NICU.  The main principle of the jet is that it is gentler to send gas in and out of the lungs by delivering smaller breaths more often which is what the jet does.  The goal is to introduce as little pressure as possible into the fragile new lungs and the jet ventilator assists in achieving this goal.  Having access to two ventilators ensures that more than one infant could benefit from this lifesaving device at one time.

PEDS Outpatients           
Portable Sleep Study Monitors (2)  
In children, problems with breathing are the leading cause of chronic illness and hospitalization.  Health begins in childhood especially for respiratory diseases.  A common breathing problem for children is called Obstructive Sleep Apnea. (OSA)  There are serious diagnostic challenges and assessing patients based on history may underestimate the proportion of children with OSA.  The portable study device has a smaller nasal catheter which allows the measure of airflow on children as young as two.  These portable sleep study monitors are essential in order to better diagnose children with OSA.

NICU    
Triple Channel Infusion Pump & Monitor 
A new vital signs monitor and IV infusion pump was needed for the road/air transport team.  The current monitor was at the end of its service and parts were no longer available.  The monitor allows measurement of all vital signs and has a battery life of up to 6 hours.  The Med System Triple Channel IV Infusion pump is designed for transport and is compact, light-weight and allows for three different infusions to be running.  With the addition of these two pieces, NICU has two complete transport set ups which is necessary with the high volume of neonatal transports in Saskatchewan.

PEDS     
Pediatric Echocardiography Machine 
The wait list for children with cardiac concerns prior to the purchase of this machine was 8-14 months.  The addition of another Pediatric Echocardiography machine was projected to add another 40% of patients to the usual schedule.  The new Echo machine provides high quality images in children born with cardiac defects avoiding further invasive procedures.

NICU    
Giraffe Omnibed      
The omnibed is an incubator and radiant warmer in one compact mobile environment.  The shuttle allows for consistent environmental temperatures of the neonate during transport within the hospital.

NICU    
Criticool Control Unit (2)       
The Criticool is a non-invasive approach to cooling therapy.  Studies show that cooling improves neurological outcome and reduces mortality.  Whole body cooling provides homogenous cooling to peripheral and central brain structures.  This whole body cooling solution is common during stays in NICU.

NICU    
Intellivue MX800 Patient Monitor       
This monitor is a patient monitor and a clinical informatics workstation at the bedside.  The monitor is designed to simplify access to the patient information needed to enhance diagnostic confidence throughout NICU.

Patient Care

SHR

Pediatric Patients Wait Room Enhancements   
Renovations to refurbish the wait area for pediatric outpatients included chairs, couches and ottomans to enhance the atmosphere that the patients experience within the waiting room.

PEDS Rec Therapy           
Nickie Training Doll  
The Nickie Training Doll is an anatomical doll used to teach caregivers and families of infants and children with special medical needs allowing caregivers to “train on the doll, not on the child”.  Examples of gastrostomy tube, nasal gastric tube, tracheostomy tube, injections stomas, PICC lines, diastat administration and urethral catheterizations all help to teach families and patients.

ACPEDS Recreational Therapy Playroom Enhancements     
High quality products to be provided for the children and families in the playroom that meet infection control guidelines.  Table and chairs for families to partake in family centred play and therapeutic recreational programming.  This area encourages “kids to be kids” and meet developmental needs while admitted, there are accessible book and toy shelves along with a comfortable reading corner and an infant and toddler play zone.

Designated Funds Enhancements   
NICU/PICU/PEDS and Child Life designated funds enhancements are used to fund items such as capnographs, Medvac Infant Immobilizer, the Cherished Memories fund, computer equipment and more.

RQHR & SHR

Playroom Grants     
Funds used to enhance the playrooms in Saskatoon and Regina.

Air Canada Transport Program

Research

Dr. Bingham, Director of Child Services – Department of Pediatrics         
“Viral Illness in Pediatric Critical Care:  Incidence, Timing & Severity of Associated Myocardial Dysfunction & Acute Kidney Injury” 
Viral respiratory illness is the leading cause of pediatric hospitalizations in North America.  It is commonly associated with extra pulmonary manifestations and complications such as myocardial dysfunction and acute kidney injury.  The incidence, timing and severity of these complications have not been well determined in pediatric literature and a better understanding on these two extra pulmonary complications will lead to earlier recognition and management.

The primary objective of this study will be to describe the incidence, timing and severity of myocardial dysfunction or AKI following a documented respiratory viral illness.  This data-collection and analysis pilot study is expected to be received and discussed on an International stage.

Bette Boechler, Director of Child Services – Department of Pediatrics  
“Developing a Child Life Program in Pediatrics” 
To develop and lay the groundwork for implementation of a Child Life Program at Children’s Hospital of Saskatchewan.  Designed to support the psychosocial needs of children, youth and families, the program will reduce the stress and trauma of illness and hospitalization for all.  Developing a “made in Saskatchewan” child life program that is based on best practices to enhance the heath care of a child during illness and hospitalization.

Research included investigation of other Child Life programs within Canada, developing therapeutic programs and materials to implement at the current Department of Pediatrics and transfer to the new Children’s Hospital of Saskatchewan.  This project will lay the groundwork for what the program would comprise and will identify the ongoing operating costs including staffing and material resources

From August 1, 2012 to July 31, 2013 Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation distributed $626,734 for current pediatric needs in the 2013 fiscal year. In addition, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exception emerging researchers and research needs.

Education

SHR

Child Life Conference
Annual conference which allows Child Life Therapists to learn on improved medical procedures and encourage normal development and the emotional well-being of children in the healthcare setting.  It is a great networking opportunity with other professionals from Canada and the US.

Saskatchewan Health Information Management Association (SHIMA) Convention
SHIMA is comprised of Health Information Management Professionals whose objective is to promote the roles of the Health Information Management Professional and to contribute to the wellness and the provision of quality healthcare through excellence in health information.  The convention is comprised of various educational speakers that address issues related to this line of work.

Pediatric Nephrology Allied Health Education
SHR approved a full service pediatric nephrology program (SPARK) so families would not have to leave the province.  This was an incredible step forward to providing the deserved nephrology care to Saskatchewan families.  Positions have been filled however; these individuals needed specialized training to fulfill their roles.  The first step of training was hands on at Children’s Hospital of Manitoba.  This provided the foundation for nurse and dietician to perform their roles in establishing the SPARK team in Saskatchewan.  The second step was to increase the level of service provided which was learned at the annual Dialysis Conference.  The unique pediatrics symposium focuses on specific issues related to pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and dialysis.

Pediatric Trainee Research Fund
To establish a pediatric trainee research fund to promote and facilitate child health related research by trainees at the University of Saskatchewan allowing their skills and knowledge to continue and to participate in research during their future careers.  The program is to provide opportunities for mentoring that generate high quality, relevant research results.  The research undertaken has prompt and direct impact on improving health.  Trainees play integral roles in advancing these and other research agendas.

Health Care Provider Information Library
With the enhancement of team communication and team spaces the information library will have the best in medical references available at their fingertips.  The annual subscriptions are available to approximately 30 physicians.

Pediatric Transport Team Education
Continuous education is necessary to provide high quality service.  Pediatric transport medicine is highly specialized and requires attendance at national or international conferences yearly.  Two of the transport team were able to attend the annual Transport Conference and share the knowledge learned with the remainder of the team.

Clef/Lip Palate & Related Craniofacial Anomalies International Conference
The international conference brings together health care providers to highlight pre-surgical management, research priorities, psychosocial aspects of facial dysmorphisms and the role of medical home model.  Two of the medical team were able to attend the annual conference and share the knowledge learned with the remainder of the team.

COMMUNITY

The Loft Program
Families in need receive food and gift hampers to help throughout the holiday season.

Equipment

SHR

Pediatric Department
Electronic Display Information Board
A communication guide for the pediatric department to receive up to date information.

NICU
Infant Warmers (3)
A therapeutic device that provides warmth to premature and full term neonates that improves outcomes and leads to quality of life.

Pediatric Outpatients
Vital Sign’s Monitor, BP and Scales
This equipment improved patient flow, bottle necks as well as assisted patients who could not stand or were too anxious to leave their parents arms.

Post Partum
Warming Cabinets
These cabinets not only warm blankets, but store and warm sterile intravenous fluids and surgical irrigation solutions to programmed digital temperature settings.

NICU
Transport Ventilator
The Pediatric Transport Team provides tertiary care to all children in Saskatchewan and average 250-300 trips per year.  This ventilator will provide safe standardized positive pressure ventilation while transporting children to care facilities throughout the province.

PICU
Ceiling Mounted Exam Lights
The PICU was in desperate need of new overhead lights. These ceiling mounted lights are a smaller version of what is used in the operating room. They are used for all procedures in the PICU such as starting IV’s, inserting catheters and hemocaths, central lines, chest tubes and well as ECHMO.

NICU
Transport Incubator
This transport incubator provides a microenvironment for neonates by ensuring they maintain their core internal temperature while regulating humidity and oxygen levels.  It is a self-contained, mobile, intensive care unit customized for air and ground and is state of the art in transporting children.

Patient Care

RQHR

Diabetes DVD’s
The booklet and DVD is given to the families of newly diagnosed children/teens with type 1 diabetes. The booklet and DVD help parents with a newly diagnosed child and their child, if old enough, to understand what type 1 diabetes is. It helps illustrate how children can live well with the diagnosis and do well at school. It makes it easy to follow and is a good introduction to the family before education is provided for all the skills and knowledge they need to self-manage their diabetes. It also reinforces that good communication with the school can help both parents and teachers provide safe environment for the child.

SHR

Mental Health Youth Care
Support within the Les & Irene Dubé Centre

Pediatric Outpatient Waitroom Enhancements
This includes chairs, couches and ottomans to enhance the atmosphere that the patients experience within the waiting room.

Designated Funds Enhancements
NICU/PICU/PEDS and Child Life designated funds were used to purchase items such as Alaris Cardinal Health Pumps, Baby Swings, Teaching Dolls and Accessories, computer equipment and more.

RQHR & SHR

Playroom Grants
Funds used to enhance the playrooms in Saskatoon and Regina.

Air Canada Transport Program

Research

Dr. Grant Miller, Department of Surgery
“Effects of Aluminum Contaminated Parenteral Nutrition on Bile Acid Transport”
Numerous infants in NICU are being treated with parenteral nutrition (PN).  Some infants, especially those requiring prolonged PN therapies, have their liver exposed to injury.  This research will help further understand and potentially prevent it.

Parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD) is a potentially life threatening problem for seriously ill infants.  Those with intestinal failure are particularly at risk.  Prolonged PN therapy leads to a reduction or cessation in bile flow, cholestasis and results in liver injury.  Research will involve investigation using an established PN study model.  If the hypothesis proves correct this will provide further evidence of the toxic effects of aluminum in infants and will support that by reducing the amount of aluminum contamination in PN it will play an important role in helping prevent liver disease in vulnerable infants.

From August 1, 2011 to July 31, 2012 Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation distributed $819,352 for current pediatric needs in the 2012 fiscal year. In addition, $100,000 was designated for a research chair position in the pediatric department for exception emerging researchers and research needs.

Education

SHR

Tides of Change Conference
This three day conference is on breastfeeding, community health, perinatal mental health, neonatal and perinatal care, education for nursing and women’s health.  Expanding our understanding of nursing practice related to women’s health and perinatal and neonatal care.

COMMUNITY

The Loft Program
Families in need received food and gift hampers to help throughout the holiday season.

Equipment

SHR

Inner City School Clinics
Vision and hearing screening equipment.

Pediatric Outpatient
Abdominal Ultrasound Probe for Kidney Biopsy
One of a kind piece of equipment in the province for Saskatchewan Pediatric & Adolescent Renal/Kidney (SPARK) Program.

Pediatric Outpatient
Weight Scales for Nephrology Exam Rooms
The scales will improve patient care, promote privacy and reduce crowding.

Maternal
Jaundice Meters (5)
This equipment allows the newest and best practices in jaundice assessment and care for newborns.  The non-invasive instrument measures skin jaundice levels and eliminates a number of newborn blood tests.

NICU
Milk Warmers (50)
Eliminates contamination risk associated with warming feedings in water.  Consistently warms milk to temperatures similar to expressed human milk and safely thaws milk in less than 30 minutes to refrigerated temperature for storage up to 24 hours.

Pediatrics
Vital Signs Monitors (2)
The purpose of the vital signs monitor is to quickly obtain accurate vital sign measurements during a child’s clinic visit in the Pediatric Outpatient Department.  Patients who primarily benefit from this piece of equipment are children with suspected or confirmed congenital and acquired heart defects.  Accurate and quick measurement of blood pressure and oxygen saturation are key to making timely treatment decisions.

Pediatric Pulmonary Clinic
Bronchoscope & Sleep Apnea Equipment
Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children as well as obstructive sleep apnea.  A new bronchoscope was purchased along with state of the art sleep apnea monitor and software as enhancements to the clinic.

Pediatrics
Biliblanket System (2)
The new system is an enhancement creating higher efficiencies.  In the past, children were being treated in an isolette which interrupted their treatment and length of treatment time.  A Biliblanket is a portable medical device for an infant that treats jaundice. The Biliblanket exerts a blue/white light that helps break down high levels of bilirubin in the infant’s bloodstream.  The new system delivers therapy, decreases stress and allows for improved exposure to the light along with faster recovery time.  Two systems were purchased to serve the growing patient need.

NICU
Giraffe Omnibed & Shuttle
The omnibed is an incubator and radiant warmer in one compact mobile environment.  The shuttle allows for consistent environmental temperatures of the neonate during transport within the hospital.

Patient Care

SHR

Mental Health Youth Care
Support within the Les & Irene Dubé Centre

PEDS
Upgrades to the PEDS Playroom, Adult/Teen Lounge/Parent’s Sleep Room

Designated Funds Enhancements
NICU/PICU/Peds and Child Life designated funds enhancements to purchase items such as Mobile Sensory Stimulus Units, vinyl graphics, music instruments, iPads and computer equipment.

RQHR & SHR

Playroom Grants
Funds to enhance the playrooms in Saskatoon and Regina.

Air Canada Transport Program

Research

Dr. Lingyum Wu, Department of Pharmacology/Dr. Tuanjie Chang
“The Role of Methylglyoxal in the Development of Childhood Obesity and the Possible Underlying Mechanism”
The percentage of Canadians who are overweight or obese has risen dramatically in recent years so much as obesity being declared a disease since 2004.  There is an epidemic of childhood obesity in Canada caused by overeating and less exercising.  Major health risks are associated with obesity like type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases.  Methylglyoxal (MG) is a metabolite of sugar, fat and protein in our body.  Two objectives to be pursued are investigating the correlation between elevated MG levels and the development of obesity.  To elucidate the mechanisms of MG induced adipocyte proliferations especially the involvement of the Akt1-mediated CDK2 pathway.

Dr. Alan Rosenberg, Department of Pediatrics
“Vitamin D Deficiency in Saskatchewan Children:  Factors Influencing Occurrence & Response to Therapy”
Vitamin D deficiency is a major public health concern.  Vitamin D is important for maintaining healthy bones.  Recent evidence has shown that vitamin D is essential for ensuring effective function of the immune system.  Low levels of vitamin D in the body is now associated with infection, cancer and autoimmune and heart disease.  The two objected is to determine the prevalence of vitamin D sufficiency , insufficiency and deficiency among healthy children and to assess dietary sources of vitamin D, rate of supplementation and sunlight exposure.  This research will determine the frequency of vitamin D deficiency in healthy young children residing in the Saskatoon Health Region.  It will determine how age, environment, diet and genetics affect vitamin D levels.  The results of this study will have an important implication for preventing disease in children now and into the long term futures.

Dr. John DeCoteau, Department of Pathology
“Evaluating the Potential Therapeutic Impact of SUV39H1 Inhibitor Chaetocin in Preclinical Models of Poor Prognosis Pediatric Acute Leukemia”
Acute leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children, comprising about 30% of all childhood malignancies.  Great progress has been made in the treatment of pediatric acute leukemia but significant challenges remain.  Pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and some forms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at high risk for treatment failure and relapse.  The objective is to develop models of pediatric AML and high risk ALL in order to test the ability of chaetocin to safely eradicate the treatment resistant leukemia stem cells responsible for the poor prognosis of these diseases.

Dr. Angela Bowen, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan
“Feelings in Pregnancy and Motherhood:  Child & Maternal Outcome”
The study is a follow up of the Feelings in Pregnancy and Motherhood Study (FIP) in Saskatchewan.  The two main goals of this study are to understand the long term effects of mother’s depression, anxiety and mood problems on the child at ages 3 & 5 and to better understand the patterns and effects of ongoing anxiety, depression, and mood in mother 3 & 5 years after giving birth.   Assessment will be on developmental, behavioural, emotional, physical outcomes, and school readiness in each child.  Collecting information from the mother about depression, anxiety, mood, stress, social support, physical    health, smoking, drug, and alcohol use and child care.

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